Shower type toilet seat / bidet

viewmaster
viewmaster Member Posts: 31
edited 19. Dec 2018, 13:30 in Living with Arthritis archive
I am guessing that I am going to struggle with bathroom cleanliness & have been looking for what is available.
And after much measuring & reading have ordered a replacement toilet seat that doubles as a butt washer!
Warm water spray along with a blow dry function should help me manage as my next operation due is to fuse my right wrist as per my left.
I have tried & really struggled to use my fused wrist & found it very difficult & painful so I am hopeful to learn how to use it prior to my opp which I am hoping will be next month.
Does anyone else have similar dexterity issues that can be addressed with something like this, also I was able to get it VAT free as it clearly is for my dissability?

Sent from my SM-G930F using Tapatalk

Comments

  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 26,104
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    The trouble is, we all have arthritis but we're all disabled in different ways by it. I've had it for well over 50 years now and am disabled most ways :lol:

    I can see where you're coming from and, if at all possible, I'd suggest you do what I did when I was contemplating getting rid of my bath and bath lift and having a walk-in shower instead. i was concerned that some eager salesman might flog me something that did a lot for his bank account but little for me so I phoned our local Adult Social Care and asked them to suggest what would be best for me. What they came up with was far better than anything I might have imagined for myself. They have so much experience of different ways of being disabled.

    It's good that you're thinking ahead but I wonder why you're having the second wrist fused when the first one doesn't seem to be a great success. My wrists both fused themselves and they did it perfectly. They are straight, strong and painfree. Mind you, it took many years of non-painfree :lol:

    I can't imagine how you will manage during your recovery when your 'good' wrist isn't. Do you have anyone to help you?
    “There is always a well-known solution to every human problem - neat, plausible, and wrong.” H.L. Mencken
  • viewmaster
    viewmaster Member Posts: 31
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi Sticky, decision was hard to make but I need to feel that I am still able to work if I can reduce the pain level by having the second fusing.
    I have found that I am still able to operate a keyboard so can continue to work for a few more years.
    Think we all put effort into making tough decisions on the best balance of medication or surgery to balance some sort of self worth & manage as much as possible our own personal care.
    I know that if I wait too long in getting the other wrist fused that I will have to stop working & will be worse off.
    This way I should also be better ready for my hips which were resurfaced & are at 15 years & will need to be swapped out for full hip replacements.
    Am sure we all like to keep as much dignity as we can for as long as we can whilst remaining some mobility & agility.

    Sent from my SM-G930F using Tapatalk
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,558
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I have opted for higher lavatories to ease the strain on my knees. We had work done on two shower rooms so installed new WCs which are also rimless so cleaning is far easier. For the one remaining WC in the bathroom I bought a raised seat from Amazon. I once tried a Gerberit lavatory at a friend's house and found it both disconcerting and not particularly effective.

    The only long-term preparation I have made for future worsening disability was moving house so I could live entirely on the ground floor. I've bought things as I've gone along once I knew what was needed. The one mistake I might have made was buying a road-worthy scooter, that has sat in the garage for over a year gathering dust because I unexpectedly began an exercise programme. I am reluctant to sell it though because I can envisage the time when I will need it.

    We are all different in what is, and how we are, affected; I am one of the lucky ones with a creaky foot in both camps and stuff that helps one day is not needed on another. My higher loos, however, are invaluable as are the cordless vacuums. DD
    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben
  • viewmaster
    viewmaster Member Posts: 31
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    dreamdaisy wrote:
    I have opted for higher lavatories to ease the strain on my knees. We had work done on two shower rooms so installed new WCs which are also rimless so cleaning is far easier. For the one remaining WC in the bathroom I bought a raised seat from Amazon. I once tried a Gerberit lavatory at a friend's house and found it both disconcerting and not particularly effective.

    The only long-term preparation I have made for future worsening disability was moving house so I could live entirely on the ground floor. I've bought things as I've gone along once I knew what was needed. The one mistake I might have made was buying a road-worthy scooter, that has sat in the garage for over a year gathering dust because I unexpectedly began an exercise programme. I am reluctant to sell it though because I can envisage the time when I will need it.

    We are all different in what is, and how we are, affected; I am one of the lucky ones with a creaky foot in both camps and stuff that helps one day is not needed on another. My higher loos, however, are invaluable as are the cordless vacuums. DD
    Hi Dreamdaisy, yes we have just gone the cordless route & very pleased, I too have found the benifits of slightly higher toilets worthwhile & for around the garden can't beat my Segway mini pro.
    Has made what was a struggle cleaning up leaves into almost a please & I have clocked up about 180 miles in just over 12 months on making outside chores more bearable.
    I will I am sure take a while to get used to washing rather than struggling to wipe, but for me hope it will work.
    Yes we have also moved house from 3 story to a 2 story & have the ground floor already made wheelchair accessible.
    But for now am making it up the stairs until it becomes too painful.


    Sent from my SM-G930F using Tapatalk
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,558
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    We were in a three storey Victorian where the stairs were very narrow as well as steel so a little was out of the question. Social Services fitted stair rails which made a difference but by the end of our time there sleeping in the ground floor dining room was very much on the cards.

    I solved the problem of the garden - she's called Jac and does two hours every fortnight during the summer. My DLA also covers the cost of a cleaner, she is invaluable as she manages the things I cannot. Good luck with the all-singing-and-dancing lavatory, I hope it is the help you want it to be. DD

    t120005
    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben
  • viewmaster
    viewmaster Member Posts: 31
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    All installed today, although I managed to keep my existing toilet as the new Washloo sits in place of the old seat & makes it slightly higher.
    Have it set up, but yet to find out how I get on with it, but it appears to do all that I need it to do .


    Sent from my SM-G930F using Tapatalk
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 26,104
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Thanks for the update. I do hope it does all you wish of it. Please let us know (in brief - no lurid details necessary :wink: ) how you get on with it as it might be useful for other forum members to know.
    “There is always a well-known solution to every human problem - neat, plausible, and wrong.” H.L. Mencken
  • Numptydumpty
    Numptydumpty Member Posts: 6,416
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi viewmaster,
    I'm in a similar situation to you. I'm debating whether or not to have my left wrist fused, having already had the right done some years ago. The main thing putting me off is the fact I won't be able to wipe my bum. I've also tried with my fused side and found it impossible!
    I'll wait with interest to hear how you get on with your shower seat, so please keep us updated.
    Numpty
  • viewmaster
    viewmaster Member Posts: 31
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Well has been interesting getting used to the shower type toilet seat, it is certainly a learning experience!
    As you can not really try this Sort of thing out before you buy it & that everyone's condition & physique will be different I can only comment from my own experience.
    Which is positive, it does take some getting used too & while not 100% effective I have found it makes a big difference.
    Personally I am hopeful over time I will improve in how I sit & position myself on the seat & how long I spend sat on it being washed.
    Still feel that I have to use toilet paper for now to be sure I am fully clean I am not sure that it will ever be 100% effective unless you can keep your cheeks apart!
    Water jet pressure is adjustable as is the position that it sprays both forward & back, along with the temperature.
    The other down side that I had not thought about is that although it does have a warm / hot air dryer that works well it can also dry out any deposits on the toilet bowel.
    So unless you can flush while sitting down after showering before drying you do have to spend a little longer cleaning the toilet after you have finished!.
    Hop this has not been too graphical & gives everyone enough to go on so to speak, would I have spent £499 on it knowing all this, well yes I would!
    But I am so glad I bought it before I have had my second wrist fused to give me the chance to get used to it & be able to make sure it is effective & work it out.


    Sent from my SM-G930F using Tapatalk
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,558
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I am pleased it's been a positive purchase, even if it turns out that you can cope perfectly well with your fused wrist it does not harm to have the extra support, I am a firm believer in belt-and-braces when it comes to aids and gadgets. I invested in a large mobility scooter and it is gathering dust in the garage: so what? I know I will need it one day and it's there, ready and waiting. DD
    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben
  • Numptydumpty
    Numptydumpty Member Posts: 6,416
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Thanks for the update viewmaster. It seems it's flawed, but hopefully with practice you'll fall into a routine and it will prove its worth.
    Good luck with your surgery.
    Numpty
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 26,104
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    That's a really good, useful assessment for anyone else contemplating going down this route and not too graphic at all. Sometimes it's more important to be clear than to be delicate.

    I find, the more wonky bits I have (and I have a lot :lol: ) the longer it takes me to get used to new things and ways of using them but, in the end, I work out my own best ways with them and, like you, I'm glad I bought them. I hope you'll continue to find more 'best ways' and thank you very much for letting us all know about it.
    “There is always a well-known solution to every human problem - neat, plausible, and wrong.” H.L. Mencken
  • viewmaster
    viewmaster Member Posts: 31
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Further to having this Washloo addition to my toilet & giving me time to get used to it can finally say it is brilliant!
    Most of the problems are down to seating position & once mastered have perfect results every time.
    So I have every confidence in my coping after my opp in 10 days time fusing my second wrist.
    Many other things will have to be dropped from my list of chores around the house, & it will be a long time before I will be up steps or ladders.
    But at least now I can keep my dignity!

    Sent from my SM-G930F using Tapatalk
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 26,104
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Brilliant! well done for persevering so that, in the end, you have got the best out of it. I hope it will be very useful especially after your op but also for years to come. Good luck for the op :D
    “There is always a well-known solution to every human problem - neat, plausible, and wrong.” H.L. Mencken
  • viewmaster
    viewmaster Member Posts: 31
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Thanks, I am hopeful that the opp takes place, but with me on the afternoon list & it being Christmas will have to wait & see.
    My other wrist was canceled after waiting 10 hours in the hospital until I was told to go home & they would let me know a new date.
    But it happens!
    Just hope not twice.

    Sent from my SM-G930F using Tapatalk
Sign In or Register to comment.

Hi, Welcome!

The community is a safe space for people living with and connected to arthritis to ask questions and share experiences. Get started by registering here and posting your first comment or question!

Sign In with a Versus Arthritis account