Almost 7 weeks post op THR revision

premierscfc04
premierscfc04 Member Posts: 57
edited 22. Jan 2019, 09:38 in Living with Arthritis archive
I ended up in the A&E as my operated hip spontaneously dislocated while I was standing at the sink. It caused me to fall and hit a radiator (fortunately it survived)
I couldn't move my operated leg because of the pain and spasms so finally agreed to speak to 999 and called an ambulance.
The X-ray showed the head was completely out of the socket and I had to go to theatre yesterday to have it relocated, luckily without the need for an incision.

Has anyone else had this happen? as I'm really worried it will happen again.

Comments

  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 26,067
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I'm not sure I've properly understood this. Are you saying you had a hip revision seven weeks ago and have now dislocated it? If so, I haven't had this happen though I'm currently awaiting a revision. Hip dislocation is what we're warned about when we have a THR as, until the supporting muscles have been strengthened by the given exercises, it remains a real danger., I think all I can suggest is that you keep doing the exercises conscientiously several
    times a day to strengthen the muscles and do take care not to take the implant beyond 90 degrees. Good luck.
    “There is always a well-known solution to every human problem - neat, plausible, and wrong.” H.L. Mencken
  • premierscfc04
    premierscfc04 Member Posts: 57
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Thanks for your reply SW, I've been very rigorous/thorough with the exercises and the surgeon/physios have been really pleased with my progress.

    The thing that worries me is the fact that I was just standing up straight and not doing any of the movements that you are warned about.

    The only factor that may contribute to the problem is that my new leg length on the operated side is 2cms longer than my other leg, so when I'm standing on both my feet my pelvis is at a angle.

    I now have to start from the beginning as if it has been done and I'm not allowed to drive and using both crutches again.
    I'm doing the prescribed full set of exercises (with difficulty because of the new bruising) several times a day as before.
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,567
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hello, I am so sorry to read this, I asked after you back in October on your other thread but as there was no reply presumed all was going well; I am so sorry it isn't.

    From my time on here it seems that people do the most damage to themselves when they are doing very little, Hileena had a tough time when doing a simple exercise caused a break in the greater trochanter and now you with this. :roll: I have not had a hip replacement and therefore no revision so cannot help on that front but I send my best wishes and I hope something can be done to sort matters sooner rather than later. Please let us know how you get on. DD
    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 26,067
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Oh dear!

    I can't really see the leg length being the reason. Once we have more than one implant they do their best to get things level but I think they rarely are completely.

    I know I was once in the kitchen and took a step sideways. Immediately I felt a problem in the THR on the side I'd stepped to and I was in hospital for 3 days. I couldn't walk at all untill then but they sent me out with a zimmer and it soon cleared up. They said the x-ray showed little change.

    If you're doing the exercises and physios are happy I think all you can do is try to put it behind you and hope it does't happen again. It will be a worry, though. Could the docs suggest a reason for it?
    “There is always a well-known solution to every human problem - neat, plausible, and wrong.” H.L. Mencken
  • premierscfc04
    premierscfc04 Member Posts: 57
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    The surgeon who relocated my hip did ask me before the op if my legs were the same length, so I asked could it be a contributary factor and he replied maybe. I will update this post when I get more information from either the physio or my surgeon.
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 26,067
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Thanks. It'd be good if you would do that as it might help someone else.
    “There is always a well-known solution to every human problem - neat, plausible, and wrong.” H.L. Mencken
  • premierscfc04
    premierscfc04 Member Posts: 57
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I saw the physio I've been with since the operation and they have said I still can't drive😫 and they have given me a single exercise to strengthen the muscles at the front of my pelvis.

    I saw the surgeon on Thursday and he said the hip dislocation was to the front of my pelvis which he said was very unusual/uncommon and that continuing to use both crutches would be beneficial to prevent another frontal dislocation. He was happy with my new excercise regime and told me to do anything that would push my pelvis forward as I now have a 50%.chance of it happening again.

    Being 11 weeks post op I'm hoping the exercises I've done and have now been given will prevent anymore setbacks. t110007
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 26,067
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    :o
    I hope so too. You'll need no incentive to carry on with those exercises, will you? I do hope you'll be in the 50% who have no further problems.

    Thanks for letting us know and the best of luck.
    “There is always a well-known solution to every human problem - neat, plausible, and wrong.” H.L. Mencken
  • premierscfc04
    premierscfc04 Member Posts: 57
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    After getting all the strength back in my operated leg after 8 weeks from my dislocation (15 weeks post op) I was hoping I had turned a corner. Unfortunately on Thursday afternoon while I was home alone I had another anterior dislocation when standing from a seated position, this time it took 2 attempts to relocate it, in the resus under deep sedation for approximately 2 mins which was unsuccessful and the successful second attempt under general in an operating theatre at 2am on Friday.
    Thankfully I'm back home now with a cricket splint (which I don't understand to be honest as they are normally used for knees) on my operated leg which I have been told will need to stay on for at least 3 months.
    I'm hoping it's the last time but who knows?
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,567
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Oh dear (understatement of the day alert!) that wasn't good was it? I know from reading on here that post-operatively hips can be tricky as one has to focus on how one moves far more than one might need to for a knee, possibly for the simple reason that knees move in one plane only whereas hips are more circular in their ROM. I hope things are improving now, keep your focus on how you move what and when. I am no doc or surgeon but common sense suggests the cricket splint is there purely to keep everything aligned and thus remove the risk of further dislocation. Good luck over the next few weeks, I hope things go better for you. DD
    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben
  • premierscfc04
    premierscfc04 Member Posts: 57
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Thanks DD, I've been having a think about what could've happened when I stood up and from what I can remember I think its if/when my pelvis moves forward as I stood up, as in anything other than perfectly straight.
    I am going to see if I can get a referral to the physio that I saw upto the end of December.
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 26,067
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I had a cricket splint after my knee revision. It was to protect the tendons (ligaments?) as the surgeon had done a bit of embroidery with them. I told everyone I'd been called up for the England squad which, at the time, was nowhere near as far-fetched as it should be :lol:

    I can just about see that, with that in place, it will be harder for you to get your leg into the 'wrong' position when getting out f a chair. i do hope it works.
    “There is always a well-known solution to every human problem - neat, plausible, and wrong.” H.L. Mencken
  • premierscfc04
    premierscfc04 Member Posts: 57
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Thanks SW, is that you got your online name 'StickyWicket'
    I have also got hold of waist splint which I'm wearing for as long as possible in the hope that it helps too.

    SW when you had your Cricket Splint on were you able to get into a car, if so how?
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 26,067
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    It wasn't like that for me. The purpose of the splint was to protect my tendons / ligaments when I was walking so I only had to wear it for the first 2-3 weeks when walking round the hóuse. I don't think there was any way I could have got into a car with it.

    As for my username - I've been a cricket fanatic all my life. It's compulsory in our family :lol:
    “There is always a well-known solution to every human problem - neat, plausible, and wrong.” H.L. Mencken
  • premierscfc04
    premierscfc04 Member Posts: 57
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Thanks again SW, I did think it could be very difficult to get in a car, I'll let you know if I manage it.
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