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Energy levels

johnnyk32ukjohnnyk32uk Member Posts: 41
edited 11. Dec 2018, 06:05 in Living with Arthritis archive
Hi folks,

I have recently started back at work on reduced hours for now but even doing less hours I am totally knackered.

What do people do to try and keep energy levels good?

I am taking plenty of breaks at work, eating and drinking healthily, having warm baths most days, resting when possible, any help or tips would be great :D

Cheers,
John

Comments

  • daffy2daffy2 Member Posts: 1,713
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    You are doing all the right things Johnny, the only thing I would perhaps add is to prioritise - ruthlessly(especially on bad days). If something isn't essential don't do it - and the definition of essential will vary from person to person. Something may not be essential in an objective sense but not doing it would cause too much distress to the individual concerned, in which case something else will have to give to make way. Many on the forum use online supermarket shopping; buying in cleaning services might be appropriate. Plan out tasks realistically and don't be tempted to do 'just one more thing' - more often than not it wasn't essential, and might be the proverbial straw of camel fame. Avoid thinking of your rest and recovery times as 'doing nothing' - you are doing something(trying to cope and stay well) and it is very important.
  • johnnyk32ukjohnnyk32uk Member Posts: 41
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Thanks daffy,

    Yes I think you are right I do need to prioritise things more and only do things if really needed. I tend to do more when I feel better, which makes sense, but also need to watch I don't overdo things!

    I will try and look at resting as more to recover and not doing nothing, although much more now I am finding when I don't do that much (watching TV or at the cinema etc) parts of me are seizing up and can become uncomfortable, my back, hip, feet and hands are all weak but still need to be moved a little. I need to try and find a good balance.

    Thanks again,
    John
  • stickywicketstickywicket Member Posts: 26,005
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Finding the right balance is an essential but ongoing task. I think I'm right in saying that everyone, not just those of us with arthritis, is told not to sit at a computer screen for more than 20 minutes at a time. (Guilty as charged :oops: ) It makes sense that repetitive actions cause strains. Sometimes I find it's enough to to stop one task and start another which uses different muscles and joints. But the 'proper rests' are essential too.

    With Christmas round the corner I'm trying, and failing, to practice what I preach.
    “There is always a well-known solution to every human problem - neat, plausible, and wrong.” H.L. Mencken
  • dreamdaisydreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,567
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Ah, energy, I vaguely remember what that is. :wink: For me the secret is not to overdo it on the better days and not to overdo it on the poorer ones. Have you read The Spoon Theory? it's an on-line article that explains, in a very clear way, the challenges those with ongoing health issues face on a daily basis. It's worth a read and I recommend it for family and friends too.

    Prioritising is essential, as is not fretting about what hasn't been done. My husband has retired and is amazed at how unimportant all his worries about work were, how much time he wasted working at weekends, how non-vital it all was but, when you're still in that world, it is hard to recognise that fact. You are doing all the right things but I think the hardest thing of all is not to do too much: stop when you think you can do more. DD
    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben
  • johnnyk32ukjohnnyk32uk Member Posts: 41
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Thanks to you both for your replies.

    I agree I need to do more to help myself, and will try taking more breaks at work if possible but as you say and know it's not always possible and my job does have deadlines to meet etc but as I have said somewhere else my work and boss have been great. People move around or get promoted quite often where I work so I might not always have an understanding boss but at the moment it's good. And being referred to occupational health backs me up as well.

    I have not heard of the spoon theory but will look that up thanks.Some very good advice advice that I will definitely take on board :D

    Thanks again,

    John
  • dreamdaisydreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,567
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    You're more than welcome, people can only do so much to help us, the rest has to come from ourselves: we have to put in the hard yards of learning what works for us and what doesn't, that takes time and experience. After twenty-plus years I still get it wrong but less often than I did, and when I get it wrong I am better at dealing with the payback. I used to blame the disease, then I tried blaming myself, now I blame neither because that gets me nowhere. Things are as they are. DD
    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben
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