Work and Arthritis

Sezyk
Sezyk Member Posts: 3
edited 26. Feb 2019, 06:27 in Living with arthritis
Can anyone help with tips for coping with a high powered fulltime job and living with severe arthritis, I have just started using cerensia and am struggling to explain over powering and debilitating pain, all advice would be most welcome.

Comments

  • moderator
    moderator Moderator Posts: 4,085
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hello and welcome Sezyk to Versus Arthritis Online Community Forum.

    Working with Arthritis is an issue in itself, you do carry my sympathy without being patronising to you. The issues of working with Arthritis is an issues that comes up regularly on the forum with some of our members. You will find the forum members most helpful with support and advice.

    I've found this link which may be of help to you:

    https://www.arthritisresearchuk.org/system/search-results.aspx?keywords=Coping+with+severe+pain.

    Please feel free to ring our friendly Helpline Team for support/advice, the number is at the head of the page.

    Enjoy the forum.

    John
  • Airwave!
    Airwave! Member Posts: 2,427
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    One of the best things I learnt was to say 'No' , don't do anything that leaves you in pain or tiredness. I should have stopped work a long time before but didn't. If you can't cope don't bash on, the only person to suffer will be you, so find a job that you can cope with.
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 26,248
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I heartily agree with Airwave. High powered equals stressful and arthritis thrives on stress.

    I've never heard of cerensia. What is it? All I can find is cerenia which is, apparently, a veterinary med.
    "The deeper sorrow carves into your being the more joy you can contain." Kahlil Gibran
  • danm2010
    danm2010 Member Posts: 32
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    When you say you give up work, how did you survive paying bills etc?


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  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,558
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I was fortunate in that I was self-employed so had a wonderful boss who truly understood the lie of the land. Once I retired in my early fifties only then did I realise what a strain working had been, I was proud of how I had coped and it was a huge relief it was not to be doing so any more. I flogged on for seventeen years (I have psoriatic and osteoarthritis, plus fibromyalgia). What kind of arthritis do you have? I am guessing it's an auto-immune and cerensia might be a bio-similar. I am married, The Spouse has recently retired and I have private means which is a terrific help.

    Whether this topic has arisen on the Benefits and Working Matters board or not I don't know but it might be worth a read-through. DD
    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 26,248
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    In a sense I was lucky because it was patently obvious, from very early on, that I wouldn't be contributing to the family income. So we were always going to be reliant on one not-very-high wage. We had to make it work for us. Having said that, it was possible, back then, to take out a mortgage on that one not-very-high wage. I think it's harder now.

    Our sons were dressed in second hand clothes, our holidays were self-catering (not much of a holiday when you have arthritis :roll: ) in UK. We had one per year if that. We never went out to restaurants or the cinema etc. I used the cheaper cuts of meat etc and could spin it out.

    Now, just two of us, on pensions it's pure luxury :lol: We can go to restaurants and not have to think so much about what to eat. Better still, we can visit our son in L.A. for a month each year, choosing times when flights are cheap and knowing that, as we'll be staying with him, we'll have no hotel bills. Happiness is :D
    "The deeper sorrow carves into your being the more joy you can contain." Kahlil Gibran