Do you have a key turner?

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stickywicket
stickywicket Member Posts: 27,719
edited 12. Oct 2019, 05:31 in Living with arthritis
I used to, in our previous house, and it worked perfectly for me.

Here we have a mortice lock (as opposed to the previous Yale) with a very close door jamb. I don't think a key turner would work on it (I no longer own one) as my gut feeling is that it would have to turn through 270 degrees but, from the outside, the door jamb is in the way.

Up to now I've fiddled and struggled by Mr SW now wants a new door and I'd like it to be one I could open :wink:

Any advice?
If at first you don't succeed, then skydiving definitely isn't for you.
Steven Wright

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  • daffy2
    daffy2 Member Posts: 1,636
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Using technology instead of/as well as a key?
    Remote door locking
    https://www.independentliving.co.uk/il-editorials/door-entry/#keyless
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,520
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    I have remembered that I had one at the old house, my mum liked it so \i have it to her. I think Daffy's idea is a good one . . .

    Our key hole is very close to a rendered wall, I can easily scrape my knuckles if I am not paying attention to what I am doing. I hope you find a solution. DD
    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben
  • GraceB
    GraceB Member Posts: 1,595
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    SW,

    Personally I'd speak to a couple of firms who do door and window replacements. See what they can suggest. Doesn't hurt to ask. It'll be interesting to know what you manage to source if you don't mind updating us once it's sorted.

    And I've learnt something today. Never realised you could use technology to open doors like that! But, thanks to Daffy, I do now. :lol:

    GraceB
    Turn a negative into a positive!
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 27,719
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    We've already spoken to one. He assured us they could put a Yale lock on at an accessible distance from the door jamb but then didn't mention it in the estimate. Another never did ring back. We'll keep trying.

    Daffy – brilliant thought. I'm a little wary of being dependent on electronics for two reasons – (i)If I can't turn a key I can always grab a passer by but, if the electronics fail...... (ii)I think Mr SW would prefer a key and I wonder if he could lock me out. We shall definitely investigate this though and thank you.
    If at first you don't succeed, then skydiving definitely isn't for you.
    Steven Wright
  • crinkly1
    crinkly1 Member Posts: 156
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    My chance to offer encouragement back to you, SW!

    By now my hands are severely affected by OA so are limited for movement but reasonably strong and I continue to use a basic key turner that's been on the market for many years. When we've moved house or fitted new doors my 'resident technician' has always been able to fit or reposition locks so they can easily be opened with my gadget.

    That is fine for me but a friend with a huge amount of RA damage and extreme weakness following small joint replacements was equipped with an electronic system that worked door locks also opened and closed curtains at least 25 years ago so the subsequent development of electronics should mean there are many variations available now plus simple options in case of failure.

    I'd suggest researching availability, prices and installation costs of all lock types before making a decision about fitting the new door with whatever best suits your dexterity and budget. You'll then emerge with a neatly fitted lock that looks good and works for you. You may have to pay but might succeed in getting VAT waived.
  • daffy2
    daffy2 Member Posts: 1,636
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Sticky I know what you mean about electronics failure, but this american site seems to include dual options.
    https://www.techlicious.com/guide/5-futuristic-smart-locks-for-your-home/
    so there should be an option available in this country I would have thought. The remote door opening mentioned in the link I first posted seems to suggest that key function is retained. The equivalent is fitted on car doors these days after all.
    Looking at my front door(standard nasty plastic thing) the width of the door frame gives quite a lot of clearance to key turning on the door itself. I don't have to use a key turner but as my fingers are so sore and sensitive to knocks I do need plenty of clearance. Options for clearance may be affected by the width of the door opening itself, but a half way useful supply firm should be able to advise.
    I got to thinking about what we could come up with if the design of doors and door furniture were up to us. I rather favour a central wheel arrangement - something like a ship's wheel or a safe door opener, geared to need minimal effort to turn and with wheel, spokes or whatever is best for our particular limitations. An easy turn would shoot all the bolts and then could be locked by our choice of key(conveniently sited) or electronics. Coupled with flush sill, automatic opener, and extra width opening it could cover all requirements don't you think?
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 27,719
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Thank you both for getting back to me. I shall certainly investigate all options though I'm rather hoping to find a joiner who will have some understanding himself so I shall run everything past him as and when and definitely keep you all updated.

    Crinkly, I'm wondering how a lock could be re-positioned. Surely to move it inwards (giving more turning space for a key turner) would mean the locking bit wouldn't extend to where it needs to go.

    Daffy, as for preference - I love the large, lever-handle locks on some disabled loos. (And, conversely, hate the tiny knobs that some have.) I don't quite understand why these can't be fitted as, as I recall, they only require a quarter turn. i think I shall investigate.
    If at first you don't succeed, then skydiving definitely isn't for you.
    Steven Wright
  • daffy2
    daffy2 Member Posts: 1,636
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    I love the large, lever-handle locks on some disabled loos.
    This kind of thing Sticky?
    https://www.gjohns.co.uk/locks-and-latches/locks-for-use-on-disabled-wc-toilet-doors/accessible-roller-toilet-lock-handle-set-for-disabled-wc-toilets-satin-stainless-steel.html
    Trouble is I'm not sure your insurer would accept them for locking external house doors, not least because many of them can be unlocked from the outside 'in case of emergency'...
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 27,719
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Oddly, I'd looked, previously, at the exact same website. I was just wondering if one could be adapted for greater security. Of course, the key turner works on the same basic principle but I think requires a greater turning space.
    If at first you don't succeed, then skydiving definitely isn't for you.
    Steven Wright
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 27,719
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    A lovely local joiner has just been round. Reassuringly, he didn't assume he'd have the answer but thought he knew a man in Carlisle who might :D This guy deal in electronic stuff and problem customers like me. (My words, not his.)

    He's thinking maybe a push-button electronic system and when I asked about potential failure and me being locked out he said it shouldn't be a problem as (something too techy for me) but he'd check with Carlisle man. He's also going to email pictures of it / them so's I can see for myself.

    He sounded kind and not at all pushy which is definitely good.

    Watch this topic :wink:
    If at first you don't succeed, then skydiving definitely isn't for you.
    Steven Wright
  • Nlondoner
    Nlondoner Member Posts: 8
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Hi All,

    I thought I'd pass on some information about the new Keywing key turner (see https://www.versusarthritis.org/news/news/innovative-key-turner-helps-open-doors-for-millions-with-arthritis/?utm_source=social&utm_medium=Twitter&utm_campaign=keywing) as I thought quite appropriate to this thread and may be an option to you stickywicket.

    It clips on to keys and makes them much easier to find, grip and turn. They are a great help to reduce hand pain and must have for anyone with arthritis in their hands or weak hand grip.

    Keywing-key-turner-blue-660x440_416x288.gif?v=1566573340

    The new design won an innovation award from the Design Council UK and a grant from charity Versus Arthritis. It is now being recommended by OT's and Hand Therapists across the UK as an improved alternative to the existing cumbersome large blue key turner products.

    attachment.php?attachmentid=2187&d=1570482859&thumb=1

    There are also a few interesting blogs on the design journey, story behind why and how it was invented, and experience engaging with arthritis groups across the UK.
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,520
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Thank you for posting this, it looks to be a useful gadget (so many aren't as they are designed by the able-bodied) and I for one will investigate as my hands are currently making their arthritic presence felt. :lol: DD
    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 27,719
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    i remember you :D I'm so pleased that your plans have come to fruition and I'm sure this will be a really useful gadget for many people. It's far less bulky and obtrusive than a regular key turner and so looks less like s disability aid (which is always a good thing in my book :wink: )

    Personally, I need the bulk of the usual turners but not many hands are as bad as mine. (I've been honing them for years :lol: )

    To anyone who contributed to this thread I must apologise for not getting back sooner. I discovered that the regular key turners will fit a mortice lock key and, as our 'door man' kindly managed to fit the lock inwards slightly on our new door, I have no problem in turning it.
    Happiness is m0150
    If at first you don't succeed, then skydiving definitely isn't for you.
    Steven Wright
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,520
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    One key turner ordered. I chose the grey and will see how it goes: if it proves to be of use for the variety of keys I have then I will get the set of three. I qualify for VAT relief so that helps, with the postage the bill was around £5.50. I bought direct from the company rather than other sources - someone on eBay was asking £8.50 per turner. I think not. DD
    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,520
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    One turner arrived but sadly it is useless as it only fits Yale style keys, something I missed in the advertising. My house keys are Banham-style so if yours are, don't bother. DD

    PS It was not easy to remove from its display card either!
    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben