Climbing over small objects

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Lotsofpain
Lotsofpain Member Posts: 157
edited 25. Mar 2019, 13:33 in Living with arthritis
One of the most difficult challenges of having arthritic hips and back is that stepping over even small objects like climbing over the small lip to get in and out of the shower is a real challenge. I have given up trying to get in the bath. I'll be having intensive physio in a week or so but does anyone have any tips in the mean time

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  • crinkly1
    crinkly1 Member Posts: 156
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    I'm sorry to hear that you are having such a frustrating time.

    Strengthening the muscles with physiotherapy may enable you to step safely over the smaller obstacles in time but I wonder if you have also considered requesting input from an Occupational Therapist? Their speciality is in helping find the best available solutions from the wide rage of products that can be obtained - either through the NHS or privately.

    Many years ago I had a home visit then a full assessment from an OT who introduced me to the wide range of aids on the market. With that initial help I learned how to search out those items that would be of most help. I haven't qualified for much financial assistance but, over the years have used DLA to purchase items that have made a big difference.
    eg As a lover of baths rather than showers I purchased a simple battery operated bath seat some time ago and wouldn't be without it - especially now, when I'm one-handed (in addition to having dodgy knees and back) while recovering from shoulder surgery.

    Your GP surgery should be able to help you make an OT appointment and I hope you, too, are able to access helpful advice that way.
  • Lotsofpain
    Lotsofpain Member Posts: 157
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    We looked at walk in baths but the price tag for a custom made one - and they are all custom made - was about £6000 so I use the shower

    Can you advise me, I 'd love one of those battery operated seats my concern is how I transfer myself from the outside of the bath on to the seats as I now definitely could not raise my legs enough to climb on to it. I would be grateful for your advice and maybe even more details of the model you use

    Thanks
  • crinkly1
    crinkly1 Member Posts: 156
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    For reasons of advertising I can't give full details but there are several options on the open market. I considered a few before deciding on what seemed best for my situation and position of the bath, one factor being that it can be quite easily removed to allow someone else to bath in the conventional way. A friend has one that folds flat enough to store underneath her freestanding bath.

    The version I have consists of a white plastic seat, with adjustable high back rest, that folds/unfolds to/from a base that adheres to the bottom of the bath with suction pads. It is operated by a control box with rechargeable battery.

    To use I put water into the bath first. To get into the bath the seat is raised level with the top of the bath side (or higher if you wish). It has side-flaps that extend across the sides of the bath from the seat so I turn with my back to the bath, sit down then lift each leg over the side and into the bath, turning so I'm seated centrally. Using the control box I then lower the seat to the bottom of the bath and enjoy my soak. Getting out afterwards is a reversed procedure.

    I don't remember the cost but it was less than £200 and I bought it via a well-known online auction site - first checking the manufacturer's own website and customer feedback etc.

    The need to lift each leg might be a problem for you but you may well be able to see and try out bath lifts at a local disability aids centre and I'm sure they are items an OT would be able to help you assess.
  • Airwave!
    Airwave! Member Posts: 2,468
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Don't forget that disability aids should be vat free.