Newly diagnosed with oa

Jayuk
Jayuk Member Posts: 24
edited 4. Jul 2019, 16:09 in Say hello
Hi everyone really need advice... I went to doctors about results from knee x ray and he said I have oa in knees only mild, if this is mild dreading when it gets worst then.. I spoke to him about could i have it in my lower back as i have had bad back for years. He said oh yes there's a possibility, I also mentioned about the stiffness and he basically was off with me asking what I wanted him to do. I didn't say anything as I was unwell with the flu and just ended up leaving it there. I came home and now I think why hasn't he done more investigations would it be best to know if it is in my lower back and neck even hands as 2 of middle fingers have lumps at the side and slightly slanted... i wasvalready on gabapentine and he has put me on naproxen 4 times a day, he did offee physio and i turned it down as last time i had it, it seemed to aggrivate my back....
I Feel so down as I'm currently on sick for a achillies injury and returning back to work next month. I struggle day to day and the thought of going back to work knowing I'm going to be more shattered. I have other health conditions, under active thyroid, fibromyalgia, b12 and folate defientcy and now oa. I've read about pip but been put off applying with the horror stories.
Thankyou in advance for hearing my moaning.

Comments

  • moderator
    moderator Moderator Posts: 4,085
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi JayUK,

    Lovely to meet you, already we have 2 things in common, I have OA and fibromyalgia too. The Naproxen is a NSAID (non-steroidal anti inflammatory drug) and is a treatment for osteoarthritis. As it says it does reduce inflammation which can make a great difference to us, I find it brilliant for my neck - it feels perfect with it. A side effect can be stomach issues so you might want to ask for a stomach protector - I use omeperazole. The other treatments are pain relief, exercise and diet including losing weight if you need to. There are other ways to help yourself, some people like warmth to soothe an aching joint or cold. Here’s our leaflet on osteoarthritis in general, you will find links within the leaflet to more information specific to the knee

    https://www.versusarthritis.org/about-arthritis/conditions/osteoarthritis/

    There’s no specialist area for osteoarthritis- if necessary in the future you could see a surgeon if a replacement joint is needed.

    Try not to worry too much, concentrate on getting well from the 'flu, when you are recovered from that you will be able to work out your way forward, and we are here to help you do that, when you think of something ask away and we will do our best to help.

    If you want to talk through your options give our helpline a ring on 0800 520 0520, 9am - 8pm.

    For information about PiP look here

    https://www.versusarthritis.org/about-arthritis/living-with-arthritis/financial-support/

    Don’t be put off claiming if you think you qualify got it, just be aware you might need to appeal if necessary.

    Looking forward to chatting to you soon
    Yvonne
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,558
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    There are two things that work against OA - it is very common and there is not much that GPs can do about it. I have OA as a result of my other arthritis, an auto-immune type so some joints have one, some the other and others both. The meds I take for my psoriatic arthritis (PsA) are controlling that well but do nothing for the OA and for good reason - OA is not connected to having an over-active immune system which is the cause of my PsA.

    I manage my OA with rest, suitable exercise every now and again and doing given physio exercises on a daily basis. That has done nothing to improve it but it has altered the pain to some extent - when other bits hurt I am. not so aware of the OA. :lol: I can do nothing to control the weather side of things, it always worsens in the cold and damp but I can avoid aggravating it by not overdoing things: my rule is to stop when I feel I can do more. I usually take four 30/500 cocodamol per day which dulls enough so I can get on but the pain is always present, twanging away. I also practise distraction techniques because things ease if I don't focus on the pain.

    I carried on working for seventeen years but was fortunate in that I was self-employed so could tailor things to suit me and my needs. People do not understand how arthritis can affect one, they wrongly associate with the elderly and as for those who tell you their grandma had it but it went away . . . . . :x

    I hope you find the forum to be of interest, we all get it because we've all got it. Things are always quieter here at the weekend plus it's very hot in some parts of the country which, although good for OA, can slow us down for other reasons! DD
    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben
  • SusiM
    SusiM Member Posts: 87
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi Jay
    Excuse me for my ignorance but what's pip? If it's a U.K thing over not heard of it as lm in Australia. I can relate to your frustrations with the doctor. Doctor's can sometimes be so arrogant and lacking in empathy. I had the most outstanding GP. If l had an issue he would run a test to be on the safe side. He didn't hold back because of cost like many doctors do. He retired and now l have another doctor who is also doing his best. There are no good clinics in my area. I have to travel 40mins away to go to a clinic that really prides itself as taking care of its patients. The GPs in my area just want you in and out as quickly as possible. Your doc most definitely should run tests on your back and hand. Even if it is OA it's beneficial for you to know what's going on in your body. It's sounds like he's assumed it is but then he could have told you that. I would go back and tell him you want it further investigated.
  • Jayuk
    Jayuk Member Posts: 24
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Thank you for your reply. I really feel down with it all and because of my other health conditions it's hard to motivate myself. I feel if my doctor would of looked into everything more and had it confirmed it's in my back and neck and hands then at least I know instead of struggling with back ache constantly and getting woken up in the night with it. I feel I cannot go back now and ask him now with the response I got from him. Even my ankles have small pockets of swelling on them..... pip is a benefit you can claim when working it's how your condition affects you day to day.
  • SusiM
    SusiM Member Posts: 87
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I can so relate to not being able to motivate yourself. I also have a bunch of added symptoms that are getting the better of me and l spend a big part of my day laying on the couch - lm not living lm existing and just enduring. I hate that life is being wasted but l just can't bring myself to do much so l understand where you're at.
    I think you can and should absolutely tell your doctor you want the other things investigated. It's your right to have them checked out and he's done the wrong thing by not investigating. You could tell him you just want to know what yr dealing with. If you don't feel comfortable how about seeing a different doctor?
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 26,253
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hello and welcome from me too.

    I don't find it surprising that your doc didn't x-ray elsewhere as the other pains are almost certain to be OA too and the pills that do / don't work for one bit will also work / not work for others. Medically speaking, it hardly matters how many places you have it as the treatment will be the same. I hope this doesn't sound unkind and unfeeling. I write as someone with close to 60 years of RA under my belt and probably 50 of OA. Virtually all joints though my back isn't too bad. I find the key is healthy eating, exercise and distraction.

    However, reading your post, I did wonder if you've ever seen a rheumatologist. Some, if not all, of your other conditions could be autoimmune related though no necessarily so. If it were me, I'd want to make sure. I'd also want another crack at physio. Physio has kept me going so many times. I'm sure I owe my independence, such as it is, to physio. A good physio will know when you should be, gently, ploughing on through the pain and when you should have a rest or change to a different exercise. Communication between the two of you is essential.

    How are things now? Any better? Any worse?
    "The deeper sorrow carves into your being the more joy you can contain." Kahlil Gibran
  • Jayuk
    Jayuk Member Posts: 24
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Thankyou again for advice and support... I'm scared to approach another doctors as I would feel like I was going behind his back and I will have big red bold writing on my note ( no she can't have anymore x-rays 😂. I feel like I just exsist and my favourite word is I'm knackered... I do have one auto immune disease the under active thyroid ( hasimoto) I recently had blood tests and the nice nurse stuck in a rm to check for antibodies and it came back clear. I have slightly constant swollen ankles and he did notice theses when he was examining my knees but didn't say anything. Will try and upload a picture .
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,558
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    There are around three hundred auto-immune inflammatory conditions and arthritis is on that spectrum; GPs are getting better informed about such things but still know only a little about a lot. For your own peace of mind (which is important) it is not skin off anyone's nose to refer you to a rheumatologist, someone who knows a lot about a little.

    I know what you mean about feeling you only exist, I am emerging from around two months in bed flattened by fibromyalgia but I've been like it before with my psoriatic arthritis and will be like it again at some point because that is how it gets me. I prefer my OA - at least I know when that will choose to play up and how to avoid my making it do so.

    I presume you meant that your ankles are always slightly swollen - it may take a little while for the naproxen to begin to get to work. I always rest with my feet up but everything from the waist down is slightly puffy by the end of the day, it's a consequence of being active. OA inflammation is localised which makes it easier to deal with than that caused by an auto-immune arthritis. There's no need to go to the lengths of posting a picture, we're all familiar with the appearance of inflammation. My left knee ended up at a mighty 27" in circumference before action was taken. :lol: DD
    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben
  • Jayuk
    Jayuk Member Posts: 24
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    dreamdaisy wrote:
    There are around three hundred auto-immune inflammatory conditions and arthritis is on that spectrum; GPs are getting better informed about such things but still know only a little about a lot. For your own peace of mind (which is important) it is not skin off anyone's nose to refer you to a rheumatologist, someone who knows a lot about a little.

    I know what you mean about feeling you only exist, I am emerging from around two months in bed flattened by fibromyalgia but I've been like it before with my psoriatic arthritis and will be like it again at some point because that is how it gets me. I prefer my OA - at least I know when that will choose to play up and how to avoid my making it do so.

    I presume you meant that your ankles are always slightly swollen - it may take a little while for the naproxen to begin to get to work. I always rest with my feet up but everything from the waist down is slightly puffy by the end of the day, it's a consequence of being active. OA inflammation is localised which makes it easier to deal with than that caused by an auto-immune arthritis. There's no need to go to the lengths of posting a picture, we're all familiar with the appearance of inflammation. My left knee ended up at a mighty 27" in circumference before action was taken. :lol: DD
    I hope you are feeling better or should i say improving as we never feel on top of the world. Fibromyalgia is horrible and fatigue is the worst . I did see a rheumatologist about 4 years ago and he was the one who diagnosed me with fibromyalgia , he had to convince me that I had it as I didn't believe I did ( I do now thou). I'm not looking forward to be going back to work and don't even want to tell them about oa as they will redeploy me in another job role... I was stuck in the office for about a month awhile back and it drove me insane and didn't help my fatigue made it worse. I'm going to see if I can speak to doctor over the phone and ask him for a print out of my health conditions and a referal to physio and maybe try and see if he will refer me to rheumatologist but won't hold my breath for that. I think if I knew I had oa in other places and would help me to know that's why things hurt, I'm sat in bed and homing in on all my aches and pains and stiffness. I don't think it's helping me mentally . I'm waffling again. Once again thankyou all for understanding
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 26,253
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I can see that things are very tough for you right now and you sound very low. I think your plan to ask for a print out for work is a good one.

    Is there anyone else in your family with autoimmune issues? That, plus your thyroid problem, might persuade your GP that you needed to be checked out again by a rheumatologist. Just very occasionally, we get people on here who have been told by a rheumatologist that they don't have an autoimmune arthritis and, much later, the signs become more obvious. But I'd emphasise that that is rare.

    Whether your other pains are autoimmune or OA, though, you still have to work out a way of living with arthritis. You write “I'm sat in bed and homing in on all my aches and pains and stiffness. I don't think it's helping me mentally.” Frankly, neither mentally nor physically. The arthritic body needs exercise and it has been shown that the more we focus on our pain the more keenly we feel it. I hope you can find a way out of this impasse.
    "The deeper sorrow carves into your being the more joy you can contain." Kahlil Gibran
  • Jayuk
    Jayuk Member Posts: 24
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I can see that things are very tough for you right now and you sound very low. I think your plan to ask for a print out for work is a good one.

    Is there anyone else in your family with autoimmune issues? That, plus your thyroid problem, might persuade your GP that you needed to be checked out again by a rheumatologist. Just very occasionally, we get people on here who have been told by a rheumatologist that they don't have an autoimmune arthritis and, much later, the signs become more obvious. But I'd emphasise that that is rare.

    Whether your other pains are autoimmune or OA, though, you still have to work out a way of living with arthritis. You write “I'm sat in bed and homing in on all my aches and pains and stiffness. I don't think it's helping me mentally.” Frankly, neither mentally nor physically. The arthritic body needs exercise and it has been shown that the more we focus on our pain the more keenly we feel it. I hope you can find a way out of this impasse.

    Thankyou stick my sister has under active thyroid oa and ra. I just feel so anxious about asking the doctor to do more test based on last appointment..... When I wrote I was sat in bed it was the time I come up to be this is the only time I feel like a fully relax am.. I hope i can stop being down and be pro active towards having oa.
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,558
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    To be diagnosed with any form of long-term condition/s isn't exactly conducive to being a happy bunny. The process of accepting arthritis as being a fact of life has been likened to the stages of grief and I suppose for those with a background of good health grieving for what has gone is entirely reasonable. First comes the denial (come off it, other people have this, not me :roll: ) anger (this is not fair! :x ) bargaining, (OK God, you take this away and I will be a better person :) ) and then finally comes the acceptance that on this occasion one is the 'other people' , that it's here to stay so let's get on with things as best we can. :|

    I've always been phlegmatic about my health because it's never been good so more of the same wasn't a big deal but, oddly enough, my OA diagnosis was because I thought that having an auto-immune kind meant my work there was done. :) To discover that both kinds was an option was a shock :lol: but after a short course of anti-depressants I was dealing with it. I wanted to come off them but my rheumatologist wisely counselled otherwise. 'When you're stronger mentally you will cope better physically' were her exact words and she was right. I tried halving the dose and it did not work so I'm back on my 20mgs of citalopram and feel no shame in that.

    Be kind to yourself, give yourself time, this is a difficult time for you and those around you. Tell your family how you are feeling but don't bang on about it, over time you will create your own family code for needing more help or less. I know that my husband feels very frustrated, even now, that he cannot 'fix' me and he still does not fully grasp how what he does is so beneficial, helpful or supportive to and for me. Bless him. DD
    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben
  • Jayuk
    Jayuk Member Posts: 24
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    dreamdaisy wrote:
    To be diagnosed with any form of long-term condition/s isn't exactly conducive to being a happy bunny. The process of accepting arthritis as being a fact of life has been likened to the stages of grief and I suppose for those with a background of good health grieving for what has gone is entirely reasonable. First comes the denial (come off it, other people have this, not me :roll: ) anger (this is not fair! :x ) bargaining, (OK God, you take this away and I will be a better person :) ) and then finally comes the acceptance that on this occasion one is the 'other people' , that it's here to stay so let's get on with things as best we can. :|

    I've always been phlegmatic about my health because it's never been good so more of the same wasn't a big deal but, oddly enough, my OA diagnosis was because I thought that having an auto-immune kind meant my work there was done. :) To discover that both kinds was an option was a shock :lol: but after a short course of anti-depressants I was dealing with it. I wanted to come off them but my rheumatologist wisely counselled otherwise. 'When you're stronger mentally you will cope better physically' were her exact words and she was right. I tried halving the dose and it did not work so I'm back on my 20mgs of citalopram and feel no shame in that.

    Be kind to yourself, give yourself time, this is a difficult time for you and those around you. Tell your family how you are feeling but don't bang on about it, over time you will create your own family code for needing more help or less. I know that my husband feels very frustrated, even now, that he cannot 'fix' me and he still does not fully grasp how what he does is so beneficial, helpful or supportive to and for me. Bless him. DD
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 26,253
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi again.

    If you want to reply to a post it's simplest to just click on 'reply to topic' at bottom left not 'reply with quote' at bottom right. Good luck :D
    "The deeper sorrow carves into your being the more joy you can contain." Kahlil Gibran