Frustrated and angry

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scozzie
scozzie Member Posts: 333
edited 7. Jul 2019, 07:21 in Living with arthritis
Hi all

Sorry, or not so sorry! Lol! It’s been quite a while since I last checked in — Arthur has been behaving himself and not bothering me too much.

However, a fortnight ago I aggravated my left knee, not sure how — I’ve been doing a lot of walking, I was in training for a long distance charity walk and doing fine. On the morning in question I woke and went to the toilet, walking as per normal first thing in the morning, when I got back I put my work clothes on, still no drama, but after I put my socks on and tried to stand I was in agony and struggling to put weight on my left leg as my knee my killing me.

Coincidentally, I had an appointment with a physio at my GP’s practice (there’s a part-time physio at most Scottish GP’s practices nowadays) that day, in the hope of getting knee strengthening exercises. Anyway, I felt that I had torn the meniscus (cartilage) in my knee and the physio didn’t disagree, so I was given a fast track appointment with a hospital physio — boy was it quick, within 40 hours I had the referral letter telling me to contact the call centre. That was two weeks ago and I’ve already seen the hospital physio.

In between times I visited A&E due to the swelling and continued pain in my knee, which was diagnosed as bursitis. I already know that I have degenerative OA in that particular knee.

On Wednesday I saw the hospital physio and was told that basically either diagnosis was correct and given some gentle exercises to help, along with rest (still) and ice.

Now what’s got me frustrated and angry is that my sister-in-law, who’s a nurse, has suggested that all my walking is to blame for my predicament — now this is coming from a woman who could have knees just as bad as mine because of all the extra weight she carries, she’s probably borderline obese.

Now I’m coming up on 60 and I’ve been active all my life, I’ve done many many fun runs, cross countries, road runs and walking, never mind all the cycling — I’d rather walk a mile than drive it.

Walking, since my original OA diagnosis has helped me lose weight and keep it off, it has also, probably, helped me to avoid developing diabetes. As well as which, I doubt I’ll ever develop osteoporosis due to all the weight baring exercise.

So, I’m angry with my sister-in-law — how dare she!!! Up until two weeks ago I was the fittest I’ve been in many many years, this enforced idleness is boring me to tears!

Aaaaaarrrrrrggggggg!

Rant over, thank you.

Comments

  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 27,710
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Quick! Pass the hosepipe. Scozzie's on fire :o:lol:

    Sorry (kind of :wink: ) but this is so unlike you. The torn meniscus / bursitis is bad enough without having to deal with the well-intentioned but utterly pointless advice that comes as a free added extra.

    Just to make you feel a bit better, scozzie, my husband started with a bit of a creaky hip about 20 years ago. He dealt with it by ignoring it and occasionally puzzling as to why this should be. I suggested OA but, obviously, a sportsman such as he wouldn't get that :roll: Five years in he decided maybe it was a bit of wear and tear so embarked on glucosamine with chondroitin. He probably took this for about 10 years before deciding it was no good. About 5 years ago it really did start playing up from time to time and the odd ibuprofen entered the scene. All this time he was playing golf once or twice a week, going on long walks and gardening. And, occasionally, getting some exercises from a physio.

    In the last year things really have deteriorated (golf is down to no more then once per week and not much walking). He finally saw the doc who did x-rays and, basically, both hips are stuffed and he can see the surgeon whenever he wants. He's now on naproxen and cocos.

    My point is that he has had OA all this time and, like you, it's the keeping going that has kept him going so well. I'm proud of him.

    Ill advice from the ill-informed? I'm not sure which was my worst. (a)The locum GP who was alarmed at my riding for the disabled and thought I should stay at home resting and doing a few exercises all day every day (I never went to him again). Or (b)the grossly overweight hospital ward orderly who, while sneezing all over me, told me my choice of meal (two salads and a dessert) wasn't enough. I had to have a sandwich with it. (I finally let her order a sandwich just to get her sneezes away from me but didn't eat it.)

    It has to be worse if they are relatives. Over the years I've been offered all the snake oil treatments available to arthritic man and woman. Doggedly, I persist in my arthritis. I guess I must just like it :wink:

    You know you're right and she's wrong. Do what you can when you can but do try not to 'recover too quickly' from the knee problem as neither meniscus tear nor bursitis lends itself to a quick fix. It might be tough if it makes her feel she's won but, if you want to prove her wrong in the end, it has to be endured.

    As for a physio in every Scottish health centre – I wish! Our wait is so long we all go to the excellent private one who doesn't overcharge and doesn't keep you coming unnecessarily.
    If at first you don't succeed, then skydiving definitely isn't for you.
    Steven Wright
  • scozzie
    scozzie Member Posts: 333
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Thanks Sticky

    Your experience has helped, I was going to ignore her "advice" anyway – I enjoy the endorphins too much that I get from all my walking.

    The physio in Scottish GP practices is meant to help cut down on doctor's workload and so they're only seeing those patients with medical needs. And it does work, it is much easier now to get an appointment with a doc when you need one.

    Paindullerwise, I'm no longer able to take Naproxen has I had some stomach issues at the beginning of the year with them (I felt Naproxen was a much drug at relieving pain), and Onmepresol made no difference, so I'm stuck with Ibuprofen, cocos and or trammies (no more than eight in total of both per day).

    Cheers
    Scozzie
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 27,710
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    I should, of course, have added the cautionary note not to get so carried away by endorphins that you forget to rest enough when pain dictates that's the required option. Arthritis is boring :lol:

    Here in the Borders, we have practice nurses not physios but they do make a big difference and are very knowledgeable and approachable.

    It's odd that you can't take naproxen but can take ibuprofen as both are NSAIDS. Another NSAID is diclofenac and many seem to think it's better. It's odd how we're all different in what we can and can't tolerate.
    If at first you don't succeed, then skydiving definitely isn't for you.
    Steven Wright
  • daffy2
    daffy2 Member Posts: 1,636
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Just because she's a nurse doesn't mean she's right! OA isn't as well understood in terms of what causes it as it could be - the accepted view of wear and tear and age are increasingly being questioned as patients present who don't fit into either category.
    It might be that the walking has caused it, but who's to say you wouldn't have developed it anyway and the walking has in fact delayed the onset of problems, like Sticky's other half?
    Now that you've got it off your chest, ignore your SIL's opinion(that's all it is), and concentrate on managing your knees as best suits you and them.
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,520
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Ah, no wonder you're in a funk: your arthritis behaved then threw a hissy fit. This is exactly what it does, at least with the OA it is slightly more predictable in when it might choose to do this. I think you were lulled into a false sense of security and have been unpleasantly jerked back to arthritic reality.

    As for the fat relly, so what? We all know on here that people truly understand nothing about the disease until it hits them, we hear about it all the time. The fact she is a tubby nurse is irrelevant, many people, no matter what their profession (or lack of) feels able to comment on my disease, and how I am handling it, because in their eyes, it's only arthritis. My peers are beginning to feel the depredations of age (I am 60) which I am finding highly amusing as I've been feeling like that for years - I am also aware that my OA is currently going through a bad patch despite the good weather. It's probably because I am getting older, the invisible shimmer of youth has finally evaporated. :lol:

    All forms of arthritis are progressive and degenerative. I do not understand the anthropomorphisng of such a vile disease, it belittles our pain, distress, exhaustion, frustration. Arthritis bites and bites at its will, not ours. DD
    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben
  • scozzie
    scozzie Member Posts: 333
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Thanks all

    I suppose the most annoying thing of all, is that I thought I had this condition covered — yeah, it niggled me from time to time, reminded me it was still part of my life occasionally, but it never really stopped me.

    Last week, for the first time ever, aside from physical injuries (ripping my right knee open three years), I had to ask someone for help to help me do my job — a part of the job where I have to kneel on my left knee, the one that’s causing all my problems at the moment — kneeling on the left knee is required for access to an area on the printing press I need to do daily.

    Over the past fortnight I have taken using a walking stick when I’m out of the house or work for the extra support (peace of mind) it gives me. At work, as well as home, I can easily stop or grab something for support, which is not always so easy when you’re out and about, lol.

    I’m fortunate at work in that I have a very supportive boss and, if I need to take a break I can — I’m easily keeping up with the work load, even with a dicky knee.

    Take care
    Scoz
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,520
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Think Jack Nicholson in The Shining:. heeeeeeeere's Johnny! That's arthritis. :lol:
    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben
  • scozzie
    scozzie Member Posts: 333
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Hahahaha hahahaha hahahaha hahahaha DD