Trademark does not imply efficacy.

Options
dreamdaisy
dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,520
edited 20. Jul 2019, 08:58 in Living with arthritis
I just spotted that line in a TV advert for the 'new' Knee Arthritis Revitiv (as recommended by pharmacists).

Does anything about Revitiv as a product imply efficacy? I would love to know how many have been bought and now lie discarded in understairs cupboard because those who have used are disappointed that they cannot walk like Sir Ian Botham. DD
Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben

Comments

  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 27,719
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Options
    I had to look up what it is. (I'm an advertisers' nightmare.) I think it's supposed to boost the circulation not do anything for arthritis. I also think - I was told this in the gym - that those of us with replaced joints should spend very little time on vibrating stuff. Is it (ahem :oops: ) a vibrator?
    If at first you don't succeed, then skydiving definitely isn't for you.
    Steven Wright
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,520
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Options
    No, it isn't but ye gods at least that would be fun. :wink: I think it is a development of the original Revitiv which is supposedly a circulation booster for the lower legs and also is supposed to 'help' those with 'arthritis' of the lite variety. What struck me was the tacit acknowledgement by the manufacturer that, basically, it has failure built in.

    I think the original was not suitable for those with peacemakers and I don't know about those with replacement joints. As with many things in life there is no quick fix for strengthening muscles, boosting circulation, losing weight, improving mobility etc. If one is able, getting out of the armchair and getting moving is the key, for those who cannot then things have to be done differently. Gadgets and gizmos have their place, what irks me is the callous playing on fears and worries of those who are vulnerable. There's a cheaper version that claims to strengthen leg muscles by sliding your feet backwards and forwards - the user does nothing active at all so how the heck will that work? At least the Revitiv stimulates the muscles with electric shocks but that won't strengthen them as much as walking. DD
    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 27,719
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Options
    Well, DD, you've convinced me I really don't need to check this one out at all. It sounds like electronic snake oil.

    Mind you, I see possibilities. If it will stimulate muscles etc then, surely, with a few modifications, it might be programmed to stimulate, say, the egg whisking muscles or the clothes hanging muscles. The washing up muscles would be a boon.

    It seems so unfair, though, that the original, at least, is “not suitable for those with peacemakers” :wink: Peacemakers deserve a chance, surely. I hear echoes of The Life of Brian, a film which stimulated my - arthritically essential - laughter muscles a great deal more than I suspect this gadget would.
    If at first you don't succeed, then skydiving definitely isn't for you.
    Steven Wright
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,520
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Options
    Oh FCOL. This canned keyboard. (I didn't type canned, it chose it for me.) Blessed are indeed the pacemakers. :x

    I have been exercising a number of muscles groups mucking about with the candles that decorate the hearth and recharging batteries for my various glass globe lights. I've also been exercising my arthritis-enhanced potty vocabulary. I am now going to venture onto the small kitchen step ladders to replace the batteries in some fairy lights because I am impatient. Who needs a gadget? Batteries and fairy lights get you moving. :D DD
    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben
  • SusiM
    SusiM Member Posts: 87
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Options
    I had to look up what it is. (I'm an advertisers' nightmare.) I think it's supposed to boost the circulation not do anything for arthritis. I also think - I was told this in the gym - that those of us with replaced joints should spend very little time on vibrating stuff. Is it (ahem :oops: ) a vibrator?

    Hahaha :lol: the most expensive and least efficient one in the world!
  • daffy2
    daffy2 Member Posts: 1,636
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Options
    SusiM wrote:
    I had to look up what it is. (I'm an advertisers' nightmare.) I think it's supposed to boost the circulation not do anything for arthritis. I also think - I was told this in the gym - that those of us with replaced joints should spend very little time on vibrating stuff. Is it (ahem :oops: ) a vibrator?

    Hahaha :lol: the most expensive and least efficient one in the world!

    Not many women in that design team perhaps ?
    I don't know where the debate is now but some time ago there was a suggestion that vibration devices could be good for osteoporosis sufferers.
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 27,719
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Options
    I wonder if they're available on prescription :wink:

    My mother bought a niagara machine which was, essentially, an electric pad which both heated up and vibrated. She loved it but, later, in the residential home, they wouldn't let her use the vibration thing as they were so concerned about her osteoporosis.

    Formerly, she would, in all innocence, tell all and sundry how wonderful her vibrator was. We couldn't stop her as she'd never have believed the alternative meaning of the word.
    If at first you don't succeed, then skydiving definitely isn't for you.
    Steven Wright
  • Airwave!
    Airwave! Member Posts: 2,466
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Options
    Those of us with osteoporosis are quite willing to forgo a vibrator! Pills, exercise and sunlight will do! Actually I haven't # anything for a goodly while..... Perhaps I'm like tigger now, I bounce!