Not much can be done really

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Twirlywoo5
Twirlywoo5 Member Posts: 37
edited 17. Sep 2019, 17:01 in Living with arthritis
I've found reading the posts and answers quite depressing . There doesn't seem that much can be done if your joints give you grief.

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  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 27,719
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    I think it depends what you mean by that. Certainly, there are no cures for any kind of arthritis but lots can be done to make it easier and easier to live with.

    What kind of arthritis do you have and where? How long have you had it and what measures do you take to lessen its impact on your life?

    I have RA and OA. For the RA, disease modifying meds are essential. For the OA it's mostly about being sensible - sensible diet and weight, not smoking, exercising (swimming and cycling are good) but not doing too much especially of any kind that stresses the joints. Doing too much, with OA, usually results in payback.

    With all arthritis we have to learn to enjoy life differently, not to try to keep on living as before, be prepared to adapt and move forwards..

    My life has constantly evolved due to my arthritis but I've always - well, almost always - been able to enjoy it one way or another.

    I'll shut up now :wink: because it's hard to know how relevant all this is for you until you tell us a little more about yourself.
    If at first you don't succeed, then skydiving definitely isn't for you.
    Steven Wright
  • Twirlywoo5
    Twirlywoo5 Member Posts: 37
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    I've osteoarthritis in my knees and thumbs . Just recently it seems to hurt more . I've a meniscus tear in my left knee and walking is very painful . I'm keeping active ..., exercises for sore knees x knee supports when walking . But now my hip and back feels sore . The doctor gave me a cortisone injection that didn't work. Feeling a bit down as life is changing . Just had a flash to the future when things will may be ..? Cant drive etc . Was reading posts on here and a few people have said with OS there is no pain relief that works , just gets on top of you when you feel low already.
  • stellabean
    stellabean Member Posts: 307
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Hi Twirlywoo5, I am sorry you have had to find us it is hard to be told you have any medical condition especially if you hadn't anticipated it. I have chrons and OA and was diagnosed with RA last year, I had a suspicion I would end up like this due to family history of these conditions, but it was still a surprise you always hope it will miss you.
    Your hip and back could be getting painful as you are adjusting how you walk to compensate for your knee being painful. It is something you will do subconsciously. You say you have had a flash to what you perceive as your possible future not everyone's condition progresses at the same rate some have very little damage, some it is quite limited to a few joints.There is no way of telling how your OA will go I know when we feel down things can seem unsurmountable but try to remember you are a lot stronger than you think.
  • Twirlywoo5
    Twirlywoo5 Member Posts: 37
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    I hope so . Doesnt feel like it at the moment . Thanks for replying . I'm ok just a bit tearful and feeling sorry for myself. Every day I get up and think it wont be as bad today , then it is .l looked on here to see if anyone had improved but just found a lot of gloom . Didn't help. I'll buck up going to physio and docs next week. Just read so many bad reports on knee replacement .
    Now I'm worrying cos I'm using knee supports which made me feel better but on here people say dont use them
    I live in a house and now worry I'm making my knees worse coming up and down stairs (someone on here said it's bad for you ) . I'll have to talk to my physio just dreading what's shes going to say . Dont want to move .
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 27,719
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    It's the arthritis getting you down. It can do. Quite a lot of people with arthritis are on anti-depressants. I've never taken them. I think I've been lucky but you can be lucky too.

    There is, indeed, a lot of gloom on here and throughout the internet. People who are happy and enjoying life rarely take time off to say so on the internet. Why would they? Forums such as this one are heavily weighted on the side of doom and gloom. People come on when they're fearful or anxious and leave again when they're not. As for knee replacements, approximately 85%-90% are successful. I've had three, all brilliant. The third one was because one gave out after 27 years.

    I think the physio will really help you. I don't think I've read anyone on here saying don't use knee supports. I very often tell people not to use them too much. We need strong muscles to support arthritic joints and knee supports encourage the muscles to take a rest. They're very useful for short periods, especially combined with exercises. But they're not a panacea. Ask your physio about them.

    Neither are steroid injections. They work well, but briefly, for some: not at all for others. But, even when they work, we are limited in how many we can have because they can do damage elsewhere.

    I don't see why doing stairs is bad for you. I've done them, purely for exercise, when my knees have been bad. It can be difficult but and painful but that's all. Again, ask your physio.

    You seem to be interpreting everything in a gloomy way which is a sure sign that you are extremely low. I find it pointless to envisage the future as no-one, arthritis or not, knows what it holds though I think, increasingly, people tend to have their futures mapped out as if all will go well. I don't think that's helpful. I've always assumed that things will deteriorate but that I will adapt, change, cope and enjoy. And that is what has always happened.
    If at first you don't succeed, then skydiving definitely isn't for you.
    Steven Wright
  • Twirlywoo5
    Twirlywoo5 Member Posts: 37
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Thank you for taking the time to talk to me . You have made me feel better . I know I'm not nearly as bad as some . You have really helped me this morning x
  • stellabean
    stellabean Member Posts: 307
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    I was really bad about 4 years ago after a spinal injection that left me hardly able to walk I sought help from a sports injury and rehab physio. I had one to one physio and then joined a group of other arthritics for pilates specially geared to our individual needs. It has helped to feel a bit more in control doing the exercises has helped me with my core strength and balance. Being in a group with others has been good as you can talk about things they understand a bit like this forum. It is hard to explain how you feel to someone who hasn't the faintest clue what you are going through. I can even laugh at myself like when my vertigo strikes and I can't get up from the floor people just run and get me a bucket as I am usually sick.
    I have just had an arthroscopy to see if they could clear the gunk out of my knee rather than replace it so soon. I was worried about a replacement. But I shouldn't have been there is an elderly man in my village who at 90 has had both his knees replaced and it has given him a new lease of life he enjoys walking again and was out of hospital after 2 days they let him out because he could use the stairs!.
    My spinal problems began after I was assaulted in 1999 and I was told by the neurosurgeon to use a wheelchair I have yet to resort to that but as his only other advice was be careful how I sneeze or fall I decided he was far from helpful. He was going on what my scans showed and said that anyone with that much damage and degeneration should be in a wheelchair. Even though I have problems with pain control I know that to sit and do nothing would only make me worse I wouldn't say I am a control freak but I feel more in control when I am able to do things to help myself.
  • Twirlywoo5
    Twirlywoo5 Member Posts: 37
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Gosh you have done well . Just hoping my sore hips are more to do with the colonoscopy I had on friday rather than knock on affect from knees .
  • Jackie47
    Jackie47 Member Posts: 108
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Apart from the medical side is there anyone you can talk to about how it’s affecting you mentally? The reason I ask is because this year has been a struggle emotionally and it has been helped by seeing a Counsellor on the NHS via my GP. None of us know what tomorrow will bring and being down makes it worse. There are Helpline’s to speak to someone you just need to Google. Sadly long term illness and depression go hand in glove but seeking help is a way forward and you are taking back some control. It might be a start not to read too many headers here that aren’t relative to your condition.
  • Twirlywoo5
    Twirlywoo5 Member Posts: 37
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Thank you are right .I dont tell my family how bad I'm feeling because they really worry about me . Last time I was at the doctors they mentioned anxiety and maybe pills to help .I dont really want to do that . There is a counseling service first steps for mental health I ll get in touch with them . It just one thing after another I wont bore you with details clinical investigations for( sorry) womb , breast colon which have come back clear. and previously husbands heart failure . I think I can put up with a bit of pain but I feel I really had to man up to walk with the pain from the meniscus tear. On a daily basis it got me down. Then I went on this site and I went a bit further down . But feel better now talking to you .... many thanks . I'm just hoping other developing pains aren't going to be as bad as I was thinking. See doc and physio next week .
  • lkn
    lkn Member Posts: 16
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Hi twirlywoo5

    Just wanted to say I recently was diagnosed with arthritis and the pain was immense. I was allergic to the first Meds and just recently stated different ones. I'm absolutely exhausted, still in pain and work full time as well. My husband has just been told he has a heart murmer and has to see a cardiologist. He is having dizzy turns and dropping things and his tight arm goes numb so getting sent to a neurologist and he hurt his thumb at work weeks ago which isn't mending so it painful every day and he now has to see a bone specialist too.

    Worried yup... bad enough with my illness but now have to see what's going on with him so yeah I can relate to feeling down and tearful too. I hate tablets and avoided them for years but now I have no choice.

    So all I can say is stay positive chin up and be happy cause if not it will bring you right down everyone is stronger than they think we all need to talk to offload and let everyone know your in pain because you are..

    Linda
  • Twirlywoo5
    Twirlywoo5 Member Posts: 37
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Thanks Linda . I know I'm not as bad off as some . I do realise that . But I think I've just got a bit low and need to buck up . Osteoarthritis is awful. Other things you can take or do things and the pain leaves even if for a short time . With this its relentless .
  • lkn
    lkn Member Posts: 16
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    That's OK. I feel for you. My mum has osteoarthritis and lupus too. She's on steroid injections quite a lot for pain. It's an awful illness. I have seronegative inflammatory arthritis at this early stage. But have many more health issues too. So I get the feeling low part all too well.

    Not to worry we are here to help each other so keep talking.

    Lynda
  • trepolpen
    trepolpen Member Posts: 504
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Hi Twirlywoo , some of us has had R/A & O/A along time , mine close to 25 years & need 7 joints replaced or fused but they wont do it because of my health/drugs & weight , anyone with a long term illness will suffer with mild depression , think you should talk to your GP for help

    having arthritis is very personal & counting how many bad joints dont work as it only takes one joint to set you back , so get help , every one on here will have done the same thing
  • Twirlywoo5
    Twirlywoo5 Member Posts: 37
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Thank you I will
  • Twirlywoo5
    Twirlywoo5 Member Posts: 37
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Thank you I will .How do you put up with the pain.
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 27,719
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Definitely distraction first. It has been demonstrated that concentrating on pain makes it worse. So does smoking. A good diet and weight help too.
    If at first you don't succeed, then skydiving definitely isn't for you.
    Steven Wright
  • Airwave!
    Airwave! Member Posts: 2,466
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Hi twirly woo, I've had arther for many years and as well as taking from me it gives me a lot, I was retired by mid 40's and haven't had to worry about work and spent the last 20 years doing exactly what I wanted in life, looking after my grandchildren, being house husband, doing things I could never have dreamed of otherwise.

    You have put your finger on the problem, it's not arther its your worrying, it's just a thought and something that can be changed by you. A positive attitude will take you a long way to beating arther. We all suffer pain and discomfort and it's the good things in life that help us not the bad thoughts and you can change yours.
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 27,719
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Airwave! wrote:
    as well as taking from me it gives me a lot,


    I love that, Airwave. You've just made me think about a new thread. Thank you.
    If at first you don't succeed, then skydiving definitely isn't for you.
    Steven Wright
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,520
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Hello, I am having a break from the forum for a while to look after myself but I wanted you to know that your username has made me smile over and over again. There is an attractive quality to it, a cheerful lightheartedness belied by your post and I hope it reflects the you you can be, not the you the arthritis is trying to create.

    I plunged into depression when my osteoarthritis was diagnosed in 2011 because I thought I'd ticked the arthritis box with already having psoriatic arthritis. To this day I take a small daily dose of an anti-depressant because if I am stronger mentally I cope better physically. I thoroughly enjoy laughing and smiling and your ' Twirlywoo' has helped me to do that during a rather low period with both the arthritis and other nonsense: thank you for inadvertantly brightening a tougher than usual time. DD
    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben