Cheilectomy operation

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chelbelle2711
chelbelle2711 Member Posts: 8
edited 23. Oct 2019, 02:54 in Living with arthritis
Hi
I have been under the hospital now for 4 years and had several cortisone injections in my big toe for arthritis. The last time was the most painful as the joint is now closed. Every time I go the see the specialist he asks me if I want to be booked in for the Cheilectomy operation, but every time I think yes I need it, I hear negative stories of people who have had either this or bunion operations. I am 49 and keep very active and the pain can last a few days and then I get some time I am pain free, so I am still thinking that maybe I should delay this. My question is, has anyone on here had this operation and it been successful?
Thanks in advance for you help :)

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  • [Deleted User]
    [Deleted User] Posts: 3,635
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Hi Chelbelle
    Welcome again to the forum glad you have found us,as I said before everyone on this forum has Arthritis of some kind so understand what you are going through.
    Glad you have found z forum you can chat on Christine
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 27,731
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Hello and welcome from me too. I have RA and OA. I've heard of people on here having bunion ops but never heard of the term you mention. Try putting it into our search engine and see what former threads come up.
    If at first you don't succeed, then skydiving definitely isn't for you.
    Steven Wright
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,520
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    What a lovely thought - a few pain free days, nice work if you can get it! Now here's another thought - after the operation recovery no pain for weeks at a time, or even longer, that sounds even better. I think I am right in saying that this type of operation is to remove extra bone growth / formation thus returning the joint to its proper state (albeit still arthritic). Do you have any other arthritic joints?

    I am the veteran of a fair few ops, most of which were to sort acute conditions and they did. Not once have I let other people's tales of woe and misfortune put me off simply because I have never researched them. Why would I? They are not me, do not have my physical troubles, my attitudes, my coping strategies, my emotional or medical history, the list goes on. Surgery is not an easy option but the fitter one is beforehand (with good muscle strength and tone) and the more patient one is after with doing the exercises, resting and not rushing things, the better the outcome can be.

    I know that operations on toes and feet can be very time-consuming in terms of recovery, the length of time it takes seems disproportionate to the 'size' of the operation but that is purely the view of a layman. I have psoriatic arthritis in all my toes and osteo in my ankles, knees and hips so my boat might be different to yours. I know in your shoes I wouldn't hesitate but that is very easy for me to say. I know that people have had successful feet ops but they rarely come back to help others because they're out there, livin' it large. I can reply because I am not, I am indoors livin' it small. DD
    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben
  • chelbelle2711
    chelbelle2711 Member Posts: 8
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Thank you Dream daisy for your reply. Yes I do have arthritis in the toe and I will consider the operation if it gets to the stage I don't have much movement. I was hoping to get some insight into the operation from other patients, but as you said I am guessing they are out enjoying their painfree lives. As this is the first time I have posted on the forum I may get a few ideas of what to do next. Thanks
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 27,731
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    If at first you don't succeed, then skydiving definitely isn't for you.
    Steven Wright
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,520
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Any form of arthritis is progressive and degenerative. Once one joint is affected we alter, quite subconciously, how we move, stand, sit etc. in an effort to reduce the discomfort in that joint, thus throwing other joints out of kilter. To my way of thinking this is how it spreads - well, one of the ways - and I speak from experience as I began with one joint and now it's in around forty. Don't wait until your toe gives up, this is the time to do it whilst you are mobile, fit and healthy. DD
    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben
  • Airwave!
    Airwave! Member Posts: 2,468
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    As with all operations, you don’t always get what you hope for, take Professional advice.
  • chelbelle2711
    chelbelle2711 Member Posts: 8
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Thank you all for you help and advice. I have done lots more research and spoken to a friend who sadly has severe arthritis and had most joints replaced and she has been advised by all her consultants to try not to operate on the feet. Also I have now spoken to many people who have had this operation and do not feel it was successful. Therefore I think for now I may try as many other options I can to deal with the pain when I have a flare up. I will be going back to see my consultant in a couple of months at which time I will discuss my concerns and see what other options I have.
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 27,731
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Thanks for the update, chelbelle. You have clearly done a lot of research and I hope you can decide on the best course of action for you. Remember we're always here if we can help.
    If at first you don't succeed, then skydiving definitely isn't for you.
    Steven Wright
  • chelbelle2711
    chelbelle2711 Member Posts: 8
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Thanks for the update, chelbelle. You have clearly done a lot of research and I hope you can decide on the best course of action for you. Remember we're always here if we can help.

    Thank you :)
  • frogmorton
    frogmorton Member Posts: 29,643
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Best of luck Chellebelle

    I am glad you are feeling better informed thanks to others' experiences.

    It would be interesting to hear what the consultant says next time you see him or her.

    Take care


    Toni xx
  • chelbelle2711
    chelbelle2711 Member Posts: 8
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    frogmorton wrote:
    Best of luck Chellebelle

    I am glad you are feeling better informed thanks to others' experiences.

    It would be interesting to hear what the consultant says next time you see him or her.

    Take care


    Toni xx


    Thank you I will keep keep you updated :)
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,520
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    I wonder if those who deemed it unsuccessful say so because they didn't achieve the outcome they wanted? People often underestimate how much work is involved in recovering from surgery and working at the physio to gain the best possible result. My first knee op turned out to be unsuccessful because no-one knew what the cause of the problem was but it gave me a pretty good three months before the inflammation began to return. Hey-ho.

    Good luck, I hope things don't get any worse. DD
    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben