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Pre op questions

OlgaOlga Posts: 6
edited 4. Nov 2019, 15:56 in Say hello
Hello
I am waiting for my hip replacement. Scheduled for end November. I am very active and reasonably young female (54).
I have few questions to anybody who went through full hip replacement:
- how quickly did you start driving again?
- did you manage to recover completely and forget that you ever were arthritic?
- How long did it take?
- can you do yoga, skiing, running without having your new hip dislocated?
- anything else I should consider post op?
Would appreciate any feedback. Thank you

Comments

  • moderatormoderator Posts: 4,082 mod
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hello Olga and welcome to the forum!

    The lead up to surgery can be a difficult time and it is understandable that you have a lot of questions. Although I recommend speaking to your surgeon for guidance regarding the recovery time and what to expect following the surgery, the members on this forum will definitely be able to share their own experiences with you.

    I have also included two links below from the Versus Arthritis website with information on hip replacements. The first link is a fact sheet and the second is a Q&A which you may find useful.

    https://www.versusarthritis.org/about-arthritis/treatments/surgery/hip-replacement-surgery/

    https://www.versusarthritis.org/about-arthritis/your-experiences/your-questions-answered/your-questions-on-surgery-and-arthritis/

    I can see you lead an active lifestyle and I do hope the surgery brings some pain relief and helps you get back to the activities you enjoy.

    Best wishes for your surgery, please check back in and let us know how you are getting on.

    Alice
  • Jackie47Jackie47 Posts: 108
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi. I had hip replacement 4 years ago. Afterwards I was placed on a 15 week enhancement programme. No sitting,sleeping low. Sleep on back for 6 weeks then only on operated side for remainder of recovery time. No bending more than 90% ,kneeling or sitting in a bath. Taught excercises to do 2/3 times a day and certain way to turn. Started them day after op. No sitting around.Was on a Zimmer frame to start with progressing to crutches/walking sticks. After 6 weeks I was allowed to walk without aids. That was my story but we all recover at different speeds . but there are rules you must keep to to avoid dislocation . It is tedious no lying.Can’t advise about driving because arthritis has caused me to stop. Unfortunately I developed a trochanter bursitis on the hip site so still get some pain now and again. After pain isn’t uncommon.As for running etc I wish. Never did it before. Next April I have to have the other hip replaced but at least I know the procedure. Good luck but as by what you say seem pretty fit so I would think you will recover well.
  • stickywicketstickywicket Posts: 25,994 ✭✭✭
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi Olga :) I've had both hips replaced (and both knees) because my OA arrived on the back of many years of RA. My erstwhile very active husband is currently awaiting a new hip.

    I can't answer all your questions as forgetting I'm arthritic is not an option for me - well, not until dementia sets in :lol: However....
    Driving - after 6 weeks provided you can do an emergency stop.
    Sleeping on the back for 6 weeks? Like Jackie, I had to but my husband was told at his recent pre-op that it's no longer considered necessary - just take care and be aware ( :? Personally, I'd rather sleep on my back and be sure.)
    I think the link that Mod Alice gave you covers most bases but, after a THR, I believe swimming should not involve the breast stroke kick.
    The best advice I can give is to remember it's a very common, safe op but that doesn't mean you'll be back to normal quickly. After the surgeon has finished his work we have to do ours. That means not rushing anything, not assuming that once we can walk the exercises can be dropped. The exercises are the really important thing as they are designed to strengthen all the muscles not just some. Be guided by your physio.

    Have you had your pre-op yet? My husband's was brilliant - a nurse, junior doc and anaesthetist all of whom were really thorough and gave him loads of time.

    If you've questions I suggest you bring them (a)to the pre-op and (b)to the Living With Arthritis forum as more people look on there.
    “There is always a well-known solution to every human problem - neat, plausible, and wrong.” H.L. Mencken
  • OlgaOlga Posts: 6
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Thank you everybody for your advises.
    I didn't have a pre-op yet, but had an 'Educational Talk' i would call it and was devastated to find out that driving is not an option until min 5 weeks (DVLA rules), I thought I could go back to normal life much quicker... Can't be off work for so long... Now thinking if I should postpone the op till better times.
    How bad you were when you had your operations? Did you walk with a stick? With zimmer-frame? Unaided?
    I felt total fraud today at the talk as I was by far the youngest and was walking unaided although with a slight limp. Maybe it is too early and i should wait?
    Thank you
  • Jackie47Jackie47 Posts: 108
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Ask yourself is there going to be a right time ? Up to you how you go about it. I’m putting mine off for 5 months because I have a couple of holidays booked and the surgeon is happy to do that. Age has no barrier. We assume it’s only older people who need replacements . Not true. If a hip is worn it needs replacing. It’s up to the individual if they have it or not. I know a guy who had both replaced in his early 30’s . Hip replacement is major surgery and the recovery is serious business something that can’t be rushed. The surgeon does his job so now it’s ours to live by the rules. It seems a long time but really it isn’t. How bad was I after op? I wasn’t bad at all, Of course you need aids to start with. What you use is what you feel comfortable with. Physios at the hospital are around to sort this. The educational talk should have covered this anyway. You say you can’t be off work for so long. It depends on your job but at least 6 weeks .Your employer has a duty of care. I guess the hospital visit was a bit overwhelming . It’s only natural to feel anxious going into the unknown.
  • OlgaOlga Posts: 6
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Thank you. Yes, you are right - it's never a right time to be unwell... A lot to think about and organise now...
  • stickywicketstickywicket Posts: 25,994 ✭✭✭
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Olga, whenever you decide to have the operation do factor in sufficient recovery time. If you don't, if you try to hurry things it won't work. Many sports are possible after a hip replacements but not to extreme levels. I read last week of a physiotherapist who is seeing more and more yoga teachers because they are pushing themselves too far rather than just doing it for therapeutic reasons. He emphasised that yoga should not be competitive.

    I wish you well with your new hip whenever you decide to have it but don't expect it to be just like an original or that all is sorted once you can walk.it's not. More rest and exercise is needed.
    “There is always a well-known solution to every human problem - neat, plausible, and wrong.” H.L. Mencken
  • OlgaOlga Posts: 6
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Decisions, decisions... :-)
    And lots of planning... I'll get there at the end :)
  • stickywicketstickywicket Posts: 25,994 ✭✭✭
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I'm sure you will. And we'll be here to help and encourage.
    “There is always a well-known solution to every human problem - neat, plausible, and wrong.” H.L. Mencken
  • OlgaOlga Posts: 6
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Thank you :P
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