Osteoarthritis if glenohumeral joints

Wendysmithgabriella
Wendysmithgabriella Member Posts: 6
edited 19. Dec 2019, 10:20 in Living with arthritis
Hello 😊

I'm new. I've just had x-rays which confirm that my bones are rubbing together and there are a number of bone spurs in both my shoulders. I had cortisone injections in both 3 weeks ago but my left shoulder is absolutely no better. I'm terrified I won't be able to save my business if I can't move my arms. I already struggle to shower etc. How bad do I need to be before replacement if this available to me? Thank you in advance xx

Comments

  • moderator
    moderator Moderator Posts: 3,640
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi Wendysmithgabriella and welcome to the forums.

    So sorry to hear of the pain from your shoulder. It is well worth keeping a "diary" of your condition, recording when things get bad or if they become a little easier, in order to help your doctor understand any changes in your condition.

    This will also inform making a correct medical diagnosis and help understand what is the best course of treatment.

    Our website has lots of information on shoulder pain: here is the section on Osteoarthritis in the shoulder that may prove to be of some use.

    https://www.versusarthritis.org/about-arthritis/conditions/osteoarthritis-oa-of-the-elbow-and-shoulder/

    You may also wish to talk to someone in full confidence. Contact our free Helplines on 0800 5200 520 (Monday–Friday, 9am–8pm)

    Best wishes
    Brynmor
  • Wendysmithgabriella
    Wendysmithgabriella Member Posts: 6
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Thank you Brynmor. I will look at the link. Didn't think of a pain diary, good idea thank you xx
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,520
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hello, I can't really help as I have only minor trouble in one shoulder (but major trouble elsewhere :roll: ). There is a thread on this board about a shoulder replacement, started by crinkly1, which might be worth a read-through.

    I think on the whole surgeons decide when the critical point has been reached, with determining factors including the amount of damage and the age of the recipient. I was refused new knees thanks to my extreme youth (I was 52) and now, eight years on, I won't be bothering as the thought of being possibly pain-free in the middle of lower-body ouch is terrifying. I've had steroid jabs in my knees for my psoriatic arthritis which did nothing and one in my right ankle for my osteoarthritis, which offered bliss for three months then of course it all came back. Now I routinely refuse any steroid as they merely con (when they can be bothered to do anything).

    We have had some shoulder people in the past but naturally, once they are sorted, they forget the forum exists until they need something else. I hope you will join their ranks and not become a member of my tribe. :lol: Good luck, I hope someone will be along who can help and please let us know how you get on. DD
  • Wendysmithgabriella
    Wendysmithgabriella Member Posts: 6
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Thank you DD I'll look for that thread about shoulders. I do have severe osteoarthritis in my knee too, apparently, but that pain is nothing compared to the shoulder pain - I'm sure that once my shoulders are "fixed" I'll feel that a lot more..... The shoulder man did say left shoulder will be sooner rather than later and I share youth (if you can call it that!😂) as I'm only 54 haha xx I wish you all the best too. It's lovely to speak to people who understand. Hubby tries to but really he has no clue. He keeps asking why I'm shaking so badly 🤣 and "whats wrong?" like I got better when I didn't yelp in pain yesterday and now there's another "problem with me today". Anyway cheers and thank you for your message xxx
  • frogmorton
    frogmorton Member Posts: 27,485
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi Wendysmithgabriella

    I am sorry to hear about your shoulder pain excruciating isn't it? My own daughter had to have a shoulder replacement at 19 due to treatment for cancer so it can done young if needs be.

    However I have another friend who had spurs like you she had an arthroscopy on hers and over 6 years later is still doing really well :)

    I don't know if they've given you that as an option??

    Best wishes

    Toni x
  • Wendysmithgabriella
    Wendysmithgabriella Member Posts: 6
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Oh gosh your poor daughter! I hope she's doing well now xx and you too xx thank you for your reply and no I haven't been told that about spurs at all so I'll question it thank you xx take care xx
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,520
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I was born unhealthy and have remained so, the trouble with this junk is it HURTS :x which makes it worse. I started the first arthritis when I was 37, the OA was diagnosed when I was 52 and now I am 60.

    It is hard for those who do not have any chronic condition to understand the challenges that face those who do because their lives have not changed: well, they think they haven't but arthritis touches the lives of everyone around the one who has it. Any form is variable but never goes away or gets better, osteoarthritis is so common (of the ten million or so in the UK with arthritis the majority have OA) I am sure that works against it and people do not understand. Why would they? I have no idea what having MS or Parkinsons feels like but I would never tell those who do what they should be doing or taking to make it go away, advice freely handed out by the ignorant to me. Twerps.

    There are two articles on the net which might be of interest to both of you: There's a Gorilla in my House and The Spoon Theory. Both describe the experience of living with chronic conditions - one person on here who posted thrice then vanished gave her boyfriend a limited number of spoons to last him the day and only then did he discover that yes, she wanted to cycle 10k or whatever but was physically unable. (That will make sense if you read the piece!)

    It is hard for those around us to understand but using the Arthritis ABC can help: adapt, believe, compromise/communicate. Over the years we have worked out a simple code: I say 'Stuff hurts,' he knows that's his cue to up the practical input. Trouble is I find myself saying it more often. :roll:

    I have two versions of the same disease but don't feel ill. Now that is a connundrum! DD

    t79122


    Loving that tree!
  • Airwave!
    Airwave! Member Posts: 2,424
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Your original question is a good one and being in a similar position I wish I knew. The delights of washing your own back in the shower are long forgotten!

    The subject of when we need treatment seems to be a subjective one and is open to different interpretations by surgeons with different ideas so there does not appear to be a cohesive treatment plan for ‘when’. The NHS works slowly and it may be that any treatment becomes less likely as we age and will gain less from a timely intervention?

    Looking around me at the number of patients that require intervention but are not being treated I don’t hold much hope out for myself and others like me.

    t78020
  • crinkly1
    crinkly1 Member Posts: 156
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    In response to 'how bad.../' I have a less gloomy take than some.

    A few years ago I had keyhole surgery to remove bone spurs and calcific deposits from my R shoulder quite soon after two ineffective steroid injections. That shoulder was back to normal within a couple of months and continues to be really good.

    Earlier this year I had a reverse total replacement of L shoulder following a combination of OA and a failed fracture repair. That was scheduled very soon after the consultant had seen me plus the x-rays and scan results. There was no hesitation and only a few weeks' wait for the op - in total about 4 months from the first appointment.

    I absolutely don't underestimate the degree of pain and restriction or your fear of possible progression so if injections don't provide relief and your consultant considers a replacement the best way forward I'm sure he/she won't delay in recommending it. You will then have the normal waiting time for your hospital.

    My experience also suggests that age is not a big factor and decisions are made more on the basis of need and bone quality.

    I hope you soon discover exactly what your consultant recommends. When you know that you can start planning and if you are not happy with the treatment offered you can, of course, ask for a second opinion.

    I hope all goes well for you.
  • Wendysmithgabriella
    Wendysmithgabriella Member Posts: 6
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Thanks everyone for your time and replies. Very interesting and helpful. I'll make a point of reading everything suggested. I have a follow up appointment in April which I'll try to bring forward as I can't deal with this pain til then. With your valuable feedback and some more research I feel more comfortable that something can be done for me at least. I'm so sorry that you're all going through this, its so hard. I just want to be normal again. I can see that I'm lucky that at least I haven't had problems for as long as some XXX

Who's Online

7
bosh
bosh
HelenS
HelenS
N1gel
N1gel
+4 Guests