In and Out of a Bath

Thisdamknee
Thisdamknee Member Posts: 6
edited 8. Jan 2020, 10:58 in Living with arthritis
Hi there

I have Osteoarthritis of the Knee and I am a Male aged 69 t78020 , and wonder how everyone get's into the bath and out, as I seem to have trouble with both, you help on this is much appreciated. thank you.

Comments

  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 26,708
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I have RA virtually everywhere. Until I got my walk-in shower (with stool and grab rails) I relied on a bath lift for years. If you don't feel quite ready for either, there are some excellent tips here https://www.versusarthritis.org/about-arthritis/living-with-arthritis/your-home/

    Also, anyone can self-refer to the local council's adult social care department and ask to see an occupational therapist who can advise on adaptations. (There will probably be a wait.) Check out any disability store for ideas. I like this one but many others are available www.abilitysuperstore.com
  • Jackie47
    Jackie47 Member Posts: 108
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Bath! Has to be a walk in shower. newyear02
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,520
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I see that Sticky has provided a comprehensive answer but here comes my two pennorth. haven't had a bath since 1997 (yup, that smell is me :wink: ) but I still clamber in and out of a bath for a shower. Getting in for a bath is easy (it is called gravity) but getting out is impossible as neither knee bends far enough plus other leg joints are affected by OA.

    I am fortunate in that I have the option of the shower over the bath (which is my regular habit as it keeps my hips mobile) or a walk-in shower with a proper seat, set at the correct height for me, plus two hand rails. I use this option when things are too bad for me to stand for any length of time under the bath shower.

    Many moons ago I contacted Social Services who provided me with a raised toilet frame and a bath board to enable me to sit when showering (a different bathroom but still a shower over the bath). The former was a boon, the latter useless, again because of the lack of bend in my knees, even in those early days.

    As the disease progresses it forces changes of behaviour upon us, be they social, domestic, private or personal. Disability is expensive as it can necessitate adaptions to existing equipment, wholesale changes to our houses etc. and what is a solution for one person is not necessarily right for another. My late MIL received a grant from the council (even though she was an owner-occupier) to have her bath removed and replaced with a walk-in shower. DD
  • frogmorton
    frogmorton Member Posts: 27,485
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I usually stick to showers now, but had only got a bath post back op many years ago.

    In those days you had the options of bathboards then bath seats!

    The bathboard went over the bath from edge to edge and you slid onto that. Then you lowered yourself onto bath seat which was inside the bath - same in reverse.

    You can google them and they do still exist so you can see what they look like. Good temporary measure if you are likely to be having surgery and prefer baths or only have a bath like I did at the time.

    My other tip is not to have a bath unless there is someone in the house to rescue you should you get stuck!! I also used to keep my mobile phone within reach for the same reason.

    Best of luck

    Toni xx
  • Mike1
    Mike1 Member Posts: 1,992
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Get hold of your Council's Social Services department and ask for an OT visit, they will look at your condition and the way you get around at home and make recommendations, they can also help with permanent loan items and accessing grants if need be. They organised ripping my bath out and installing a wet room with sit down shower, raised loo, handrails etc and also other items around my bungalow. As I survive on benefits it didn't cost me a penny.
  • N1gel
    N1gel Member Posts: 129
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I have OA in just one elbow but a pre-existing disability means I use my arms more than my legs to mobilise.

    The Occupational terrorist got me a bath lift, but I hated it and soon took it out, it was replacing some key bodily bending and flexing activity with some thumb exercise!

    To get in I sort of slide down the back of the bath while holding the sides (make sure you don't choose the tap end!).

    I only have a shower mixer so I'm moving all the time in the bottom of the bath and I keep the towel by the bath to quickly dry off.

    Then, I swivel through 90deg on my backside, hooking my legs over the side. Brace my arms on the opposite lip and hoist myself up with my trunk muscles; which is great for core stability training.
    (I think the young people call it 'planking' :D :shock: I'm 57 btw)

    It won't work for everyone but might inspire some lateral thinking to keep moving.
  • frogmorton
    frogmorton Member Posts: 27,485
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Blimey N1gel that takes some doing. I take it you are sensible and make sure someone's in the house incase anything went wrong..... :shock:

    I am impressed.
  • N1gel
    N1gel Member Posts: 129
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    frogmorton wrote:
    Blimey N1gel that takes some doing. I take it you are sensible and make sure someone's in the house incase anything went wrong..... :shock:

    I am impressed.

    To be honest it's an evolution from what I've done all my life so I didn't even think about it. I was more worried about saving my elbows and the lack of movement in using the bathlift.

    But I always have my mobile phone with me! (if I got stuck I'd want some entertainment).
  • frogmorton
    frogmorton Member Posts: 27,485
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I love it!! I always have mine with me too very wise!!

    Toni :lol:

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