new member hello all

mandapanda83
mandapanda83 Member Posts: 6
edited 8. Jan 2020, 12:31 in Say Hello
Hi everyone!! Im 36 and I was diagnosed with Axial Spondyloarthiritis and chronic inflammatory Sacroiliitis in the middle of last year. Im finding it quite hard to come to terms with still. I also suffer with recurrent Uveitis. Im on a cocktail of medication right now just for pain and symptom management. I feel like Im constantly moaning about it to my partner so now can I moan a little to you. I feel Im a little too young to have such a diagnosis. Anyway my children wont leave me alone so I must go.
Thankyou for reading.
t69044

Comments

  • moderator
    moderator Moderator Posts: 4,088
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi mandapanda83 lovely to see you join the Versus Arthritis forums.

    So sorry to hear about your diagnosis, but be reassured you are not alone and there is a whole community who will understand you. So yes, this is a great place to come and complain and also get suggestions and support :D

    Sadly, age is no barrier to the onset of spondyloarthritis in its many forms. You may like to read on under our page on ankylosing spondylitis: the treatment and self-management advice is very similar for people with other types of spondyloarthritis.

    https://www.versusarthritis.org/about-arthritis/conditions/ankylosing-spondylitis/

    Do join in, let us know how you are getting on, and also to offer help and advice to others on the forum.

    All best wishes
    Brynmor
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 26,358
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Sadly there's no such thing as too young for arthritis. I was diagnosed at 15 and I think our youngest person on here was 18 months.

    At a young age it's usually an autoimmune form. Mine is RA. I'm not quite sure about what you describe though uveitis can often go alongside RA etc. Was it diagnosed by a rheumatologist and are you on DMARDS? (Disease Modifying Anti-Rheumatic Drugs) eg methotrexate or sulphasalazine.

    Trying to cope with small chidren plus arthritis is no picnic. I did it but, looking back, I'm not sure how :lol:

    Please join in on the other forums wherever you like. or ask questions and we'll try to answer.
  • mandapanda83
    mandapanda83 Member Posts: 6
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    hi thanks for the replies. Yes I was diagnosed by my rheumatologist currently taking methotrexate 15mg, celecoxib and steroids. Also codiene when needed. I find it so painful and tiring.

    I dont know how im doing it either right now with small children. I think Im on auto pilot :|
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 26,358
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Autopilot can be very useful in dealing with problems but we can't live like that. Arthritis doesn't just go away. It is almost always painful and tiring but we can help ourselves by adapting to it.

    We have to change the way we do things and when we do them; build in rest periods; buy gadgets to make our lives easier (a cordless vac is essential for me but lots of smaller things too); learn to say no to others' kindly meant invitations; learn to accept help and ask for it when necessary.

    Arthritis does affect a whole family albeit in different ways. So we have to explain sometimes that Mummy can't do that today because of her poorly back so shall we do this instead? Husbands can be the slowest learners. After 50+ years of arthritic marriage Mr SW will still put essential items high up in the fridge where I can't reach. Or leave me a trail of objects to stumble over on the laminated floor which has no rugs for me to stumble over :roll: :lol:

    We all learn slowly but get there in the end. And our kids are no worse for it. A spot of kindly taught independence does them no harm at all.
  • mandapanda83
    mandapanda83 Member Posts: 6
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Thankyou stickywicket 😊 some great advice there! Also why didn't I think of a cordless lighter hoover. It would make hoovering less painful I reckon. Thanks again.
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,557
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I can't help on the child-rearing front as I am deliberately childless but I adore my cordless vacuums. I don't recommend Dyson, like all their other vacs their cordless are cumbersome, top-heavy and the run time is pretty poor. I have a total of three, one upstairs and two downstairs (our ground floor is around 100' in length) and would not be without them. I've also bought a steam generator iron and a lighter ironing board.

    You get what you pay for and it is worth investing good money in essential household kit for ease of use and reliability. DD

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