M 34 Osteoarthritis

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SouthEastDetecting
SouthEastDetecting Member Posts: 10
edited 12. Feb 2020, 10:54 in Living with arthritis
Hi all, I’ve just recently been diagnosed with Osteoarthritis. After lower back pain that was so bad I couldn’t even bend 20 degrees I went to the doctors who sent me for an X-ray. Three days later I was called into doctors who told me I have Osteoarthritis in my pelvis and lower spine and they referred me to the MSK team (who I haven’t seen yet).

At 34 this is a massive shock. I’m hoping someone will give me some advice on what to expect? I’m pretty confident I have it in my neck, shoulders, knees and ankles too due to pain I’ve been experiencing in them areas.

Will this ‘MSK Team’ do more scans to see the extent?
The unknown is the worst, I have a good career as a train driver and a young family and am worried this is going to have a major impact on my life.

Thanks for reading
Phil

Comments

  • [Deleted User]
    [Deleted User] Posts: 3,635
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Hi Phil and welcome to the forum,
    Being newly diagnosed does come as a shock. It's a frightening and frustrating experience, and especially so when you are on the younger side, are used to being relatively fit and healthy and have dependents.

    I'm including a link to the section on Osteoarthritis on the Versus Arthritis website, in case you haven't come across it already. There's some useful info on here. https://www.versusarthritis.org/about-arthritis/conditions/osteoarthritis/

    And there's also some specific info about Osteoarthritis of the spine here:
    https://www.versusarthritis.org/about-arthritis/conditions/osteoarthritis-oa-of-the-spine/

    I don't have Osteoarthritis myself so am not familiar with the pathway from here on with the MSK team. However there are plenty of people on here who do suffer from Osteoarthritis and I'm sure someone will be along to offer some guidance based on their own experiences.

    There is a search function on the forum for finding which can be really useful for finding past discussions on a subject and please do ask questions and feel welcome to participate in discussions on here.

    wishing you all the best,

    Ann
  • SouthEastDetecting
    SouthEastDetecting Member Posts: 10
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Thanks Ann, yeah certainly is frightening.

    I’ll be sure to check out your links, thanks so much for replying.
    Likewise if there is anyone else in a similar boat or has any helpful info it would be much appreciated. : :D

    Cheers
    Phil
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,520
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    The only boat I'm in like yours is the OA one, there the similarities end. I began my first arthritis when I was 37 then OA was diagnosed when I was 52. I clearly recall the shock because I had blithely assumed that, as far as arthritis was concerned, I had ticked that box. I was born sickly which has helped a great deal in later life because you never miss what you never had and coping strategies are already established.

    OA is mistakenly associated with the elderly and, truth be told, there is not much on offer from GPs apart from pain relief, maybe an anti-inflammatory med and a course of physio. Any form of arthritis is degenerative and progressive but nobody can predict the future, not even healthy people. Let's wait and see what the MSK people say, what they recommend and take it from there, yes? Regarding your employers they do have a duty of care but I was self-employed during my working years so had a terrific boss who completely understood what was going on so. This might be the time to join a union . . . . . ?

    Pain relief won't achieve much, physio exercises should be done on a daily basis because stronger, more flexible muscles will better support the affected joints and keeping your mind occupied with matters other than arthritis is key. Living with arthritis is very much a case of knowing your ABC: adapt, believe and compromise: adapt your behaviours to better manage the demands of the disease, believe in yourself, compromise in prioritising events, limiting behaviours. Arthritis changes how we live our lifes but does not have to change what we get out of life.

    Please let us know how your MSK appointment goes. I've never been to such a clinic so would be interested to hear what they say. Take someone with you, if possible, as another pair of ears is often handy. DD
    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 27,723
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    I hlonestly don't know how things will go, Phil, but obviously, with a young family, you'll be very anxious.

    I can't really help. I've never done an MSK clinic. I've had rheumatoid arthritis for years and osteo for a few less. Fortunately, my back is pretty good.

    One thing I do know. Exercises are the best way of keeping muscles strong and supportive and joints that are well supported by strong muscles hurt less. I imagine your job is pretty sedentary and maybe you tend to stay in the same position for a long time so any exercises you can do to counteract this will help. Personally, I'd ask at the MSK clinic.

    Good luck and please let us know how you get on.
    If at first you don't succeed, then skydiving definitely isn't for you.
    Steven Wright
  • SouthEastDetecting
    SouthEastDetecting Member Posts: 10
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Thanks guys so much for the replies/advice and support. I will definitely let you know how the MSK appointment goes (if I ever get the referral through the post :x )
    I really hope it’s not as bad as I’m thinking, at the moment I seem to be getting worst everyday since my diagnosis. My back and neck is constant and my ankles and knees at the end of the day :( not good!

    Thanks again guys, I’ll keep you posted 👍🏼
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 27,723
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    It may sound stupid but do try not to stress about it all. Arthritis loves stress. It gobbles it up and gets stronger. Relaxation exercises might help. Plus, some good info on work here. Much of it will be irrelevant to you (You can hardly drive a train from home :wink: ) but other stuff might be helpful. https://www.versusarthritis.org/about-arthritis/living-with-arthritis/work/
    If at first you don't succeed, then skydiving definitely isn't for you.
    Steven Wright
  • SouthEastDetecting
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    Finally got a date for MSK (16th April). Unfortunately the pain has got worse and I’m now experiencing it in virtually all my joints. Is this to be expected? Or would you say this is ‘rapid degenerative’ ?

    Thanks all
    Phil
  • Airwave!
    Airwave! Member Posts: 2,468
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    You will probably see a gp specialist, who will watch you move, it’s quite in depth with you having an input. After six months or so on the last visit the gp balanced the chance of surgery in one hand against Pain Clinic in the other and my comparative youth won out and off I went to Pain Therapy Clinic, which parts of it I used to Tutor for the NHS. I must admit I went with low hopes but I did get a lot out of it and yes it helps you cope.

    I would rather have a replacement but having had two, you don’t always get what you wish for after recovery. Replacing so many joints is not on the cards so there I rest. At the end of the day you just have to accept that arther is here to stay and life needs to change to cope.


    its a grin, honest!