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Isolation

At the onset of "isolation" I said that it would be no different from normal for me as I live alone and am virtually housebound anyway, only seeing my home help once a week and my sister once a week if she is able; admittedly supplemented by the occasion visit to my village shop for milk and bread. My home help phoned last night to say that she will not be coming until we have gotten a grip on the virus as one of her clients is 96 and she is withdrawing from all others, including her family, to look after him. My sister works in a supermarket and is, therefore, at high risk of getting the virus from the idiots that push their luck, as I am in the high risk group if I catch it she is understandably keeping away as well. I can't go to the shop for fear of picking up the bug which would undoubtedly finish me off. Thank goodness I have my cat to talk to - and that is not a joke!

Comments

  • dreamdaisydreamdaisy Posts: 31,214

    These are difficult times for everyone (I bet the divorce rate will soar) but especially so for those who live alone. For me this kind of isolation is nothing new and therefore manageable but for those whose disabilities have come later in life it must be difficult. It might also hard to chat to someone when neither of you have gone anywhere apart from one room into another!

    My neighbourhood has a local email and has set up smaller groups to whatsapp people, using the video call facility. Could that be an option for the residents of Goldsithey? DD

    What a day. Not much happened and then I was tired.
  • Mike1Mike1 Posts: 178

    Hi DD, there is a village facebook group but I do not do any social media - other than this.

  • louisealicelouisealice Posts: 18

    Hi Mike,

    sorry to hear about your situation.

    If you don't do social media, but do have an internet connection, could I suggest Zoom or Skype.

    I've literally been added to these in the last few days and although it's not like having someone in the house, you would at least be able to speak to your sister. Don't be put off by any initial set up problems - persevere, they are easy and free.

    Let us know how you get on.

    Louise

  • Eir23Eir23 Posts: 15
    Hi Mike
    I am also in the high risk group, therefore am housebound for 12 weeks. I received my letter from the NHS on Tuesday.. They are in the process of organizing volunteers to contact us by telephone for support during our 12 week isolation, they will also collect prescriptions and shopping for you. It will all be done with no contact.
    Hope this will be of some help.to you.
  • Mike1Mike1 Posts: 178

    I am on a special BT deal for low income/disabled at £9.95 per month, although a great saving on what I had to pay before they cut my internet speed so my laptop will no longer support downloading films and things like Skype.

  • stellabeanstellabean Posts: 163

    Hi Mike it is a shame that BT don't allow you to use more speed just during this time they make enough profits from us all. When I had problems with them in the past I wrote directly to the CEO and the doodoo hit the fan.Might be an idea to send him an email directly suggesting that for all those like you it would be so helpful to be able to skype with your family especially as you can't be with them.

  • louisealicelouisealice Posts: 18

    mike

    I agree with Stellabean - you've nothing to lose and if you raise the issue with BT they might be shamed into it and your action could potentially help others in the same situation.

    hope you've got a bit of sunshine today - here in Northern Ireland it's a proper spring day - even if we're only looking out at it.

    Only other thing I wondered was that if your sister or any of her contacts was on social media, could they check is there any local scheme going for contact calls? I've seen a lot from charities, community groups, churches etc around the country.

    All the best Louise

  • Mike1Mike1 Posts: 178

    I am really fed up with people banging on about how they are suffering with isolation, how do they think that us housebound disabled who live alone manage on a day to day basis? Perhaps after this virus is over there may be some understanding in the community. I have not seen anyone for over a week since my Home Help has had to withdraw her services as one of her clients is 96 living alone so she is keeping away from everyone else, including her family, to protect him as best as she can. My sister is not visiting as she is at high risk of catching the virus from her work in a supermarket and I am at high risk if I catch it. Being 61 I do not seem to be on anyone's radar as I am not classed as elderly. I ran out of bread yesterday and have enough milk for brews for the rest of today so tomorrow I will have to decide whether to go without or put myself at risk by trying to get to the village shop, although they will deliver they are only taking card payments over the phone and there is a minimum spend of a tenner.  Luckily I do have a supermarket delivery scheduled for next Wednesday.

  • Eir23Eir23 Posts: 15
    Hi Mike
    Could your sister get the items you need, then leave them on your doorstep? Can you find any volunteering groups online who could help with deliveries?
  • Mike1Mike1 Posts: 178

    Checked for local support groups but they are all linked to facebook which I do not do. My sister lives a few miles away and, having OA herself but having to work in a supermarket, I will not add extra responsibilities on her although I know that she would be more than willing to help. I have a mask that I use on the rare occasions when I am able to do a bit of woodwork so I shall be donning that dreckly and making a dash to the village shop on my mobility scooter, then loiter outside until there is nobody else in there before getting the bits I need. Thanks for your concern.

  • Mike1Mike1 Posts: 178
    edited March 28

    Well, I won't be going to the village shop again until this is all over. They are responsibly only letting two people in the shop at any one time, when I usually go up there that is all there are anyway as we are only a small village. It opened at 9am and I arrived a few minutes before, parked my mobility scooter outside and was first to arrive. Within the next 5 minutes 4 cars arrived and by the time the shop opened there were 8 people queued outside, none of whom I have seen before - they turned out to be mainly 2nd home owners who have ignored the Gov's instructions. As soon as the door opened I got onto my crutches and was immediately pushed past by an ignorant woman who proceeded to browse around the place instead of, as I thought people would, nipping in getting what you need and leaving. It was obvious that she had not been there before as she didn't know where anything was. Although the shop owners stipulated two shoppers at a time - signs on the windows and doors - someone else came in ignoring the signs. As I was settling back onto my scooter I heard most people in the queue relating tales of how much of a hassle it is in the supermarkets! So they are obviously able to get to them yet seem to be fixated on buying up as much as they can. Oh, and by the way, I was the only one wearing a mask and keeping to the 2 metre gap! So, at least I got to see another human but I was anxious about the risk all the time and told myself off for going in the first place. Hey ho, I have an ASDA order due to be delivered on Wednesday so will get on the internet thingy the day before to update the order, and I managed to book a Morrisons order for the 16th April. Back to isolation with the cat - deep joy!

  • stellabeanstellabean Posts: 163

    Glad you made it to the shop Mike, I went to our local today, as I went up the steps one of the staff was going home and we were approached by a woman we had never seen before she had at least 5 shopping bags with her. She wanted the shop to only let one person in HER first and alone but it is large enough for more and when she was told that she too the huff and stormed off. Well done getting your home deliveries I haven't had much luck but it looks like I have to make another trip to the vets on Monday to collect some more meds for our sick dog so if I need something I will try to get it while out.

  • dreamdaisydreamdaisy Posts: 31,214

    Of course people are banging on about how hard they are finding this situation, Mike, because for them it is. Why would they begin to realise that for others this is merely the norm magnified? They will learn little and forget much because they have the misfortune to have good health. Pity them, they are poor saps who lack spines.

    Back in the 60s I spent entire summers indoors wih the curtains drawn due to severe asthma (this was pre-inhaler days). A black and white telly with two channels which was only on for a few hours a day, a radio that had to warm up, they were the sole sources of entertainment until we got our first telephone (with a party line). Now I have freeview TV with endless repeats, my mobile by my bed, bigger phones in the sitting room and kitchen which aren't corded, a digital radio/alarm and I can watch endless cats doing stupid things on the internet (cheers for that, Sir Time Berners-Lee). Although we are confined (and for good reason) let's try not to lose sight of, in many ways, how fortunate we are. Yes, shopping is a challenge and we may not be able to get what we want but compared to millions around the world this remains a time of plenty. As a society we have become used to having too much. DD

    What a day. Not much happened and then I was tired.
  • Mike1Mike1 Posts: 178

    I too spent a summer locked in in the 60's but that was in hospital with TB, my Dad was also locked in elsewhere in the same hospital with TB but not allowed to see each other. I agree that the more people have these days the more they want.

  • louisealicelouisealice Posts: 18

    Mike

    I'm so sorry you're having such a rough time.

    I understand what you're saying about the local groups being linked to facebook, but it's such a pity you're not in an area where neighbours are coming together to help those in difficulty out.

    Locally a lot of streets/neighbours have been doing flyers physically through the door with a contact number for someone in the street coordinating volunteers to do essential shopping for those who can't go out.

    I'm too far out of town to be included, but am very lucky as I have family nearby who have been getting me all I need.

    Is there a local councillor - usually the council website lists contact numbers - who you could explain your situation to and see if they could follow up on your behalf for help voluntary or other in your local area?

  • Mike1Mike1 Posts: 178

    I have a home delivery from ASDA tomorrow so I should be OK for a while, even managed to get the cat's favourite biscuits so she will be happy.

  • Airwave!Airwave! Posts: 2,252

    Hi Mike, You’re in a bit of a conundrum there, the pleasure of living in a nice county but all the hardships of being isolated (in more ways than one). I spoke to a person in Guernsey and I said about being in utopia, he said it was more like Alcatraz (the ferry was down for weeks) and he was caring for his partner and couldn’t go anywhere even to the shops. So, for one reason and another there are many others in the same predicament, some will drop through any safety net devised?

    We have a similar problem with second home owners and holiday rental places around here, at Xmas I reckon there are about 1 in ten lights on where I live, it keeps the corner shop going but the house prices high, as for trying to drive anywhere in summer, forget it.

    Apart from getting all those irksome jobs done, YouTube is keeping me going.

    keep smiling.

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