Going back on meds after swollen glands :-/

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Hi everyone,

I hope you're as well as you can be today 🙂

Does anyone have experience of going back on their meds after their glands have been swollen? The glands in my neck came up on Friday 20th March. They were very large and painful until the following Tuesday, but I didn't have any other symptoms. However, as swollen glands can be a sign that the immune system is fighting an infection or virus, I stopped my meds immediately. Now my GP says I can resume things (methotrexate and golimumab), but for some reason I'm feeling a bit anxious about it 😕

Best wishes,

Phee

PsA (psoriatic arthritis) and other things since 1990. Happy to help when I can :-)

Comments

  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,520
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    I empathise, Phee, I had a recent bout of enormous tonsils which required anti-bios and had around a month off the meth and humira: resuming them was not a big deal as I had already been socially absent for some time (and will be for some time further) but, as I understand it, you have a carer or carers who come in? If so your vulnerability is exponentially increased. :(

    It's a rock and a hard place, isn't it? Stay off the meds for covid reasons and risk the disease getting into its easy stride or keep the lid on it, repeatedly disinfect everything and everyone around you and hope for the best. I opted for the latter but my situation is different . . . . Is it the current public situation that is giving you the wobblies? DD

    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben
  • phoenixoxo
    phoenixoxo Member Posts: 625
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    Thanks for taking the time to respond, DD 🙂

    Yes, I remember your tonsillitis; I hope you're fully recovered now. I have one carer, who visits twice weekly. The closest she gets to me is when she attends to my freaky feet while I'm sitting in my recliner chair. She always wears gloves while she's here, and since last week she's been wearing a mask too. She hasn't had any obvious symptoms of COVID-19, but I've explained to her (also for the benefit of her other clients) that it's possible to be a carrier and to transmit the virus even if you're not coughing and running a temperature. I think we're taking all possible precautions now, including doing a lot of disinfecting. But there is a possibility that I picked up something before the government issued instructions about social distancing, so it's all a bit of a mystery at the moment.

    I haven't had blood tests for a while, which is adding to the worry, I think. When I asked about this, the doc said they were still being set up for the extremely vulnerable group as they'll involve a phlebotomist coming to people's homes. A receptionist is going to call to make an appointment; I hope it'll be soon as the joints are beginning to RAGE 💥

    Thanks again, DD 👍️

    Best wishes,

    Phee

    PsA (psoriatic arthritis) and other things since 1990. Happy to help when I can :-)
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,520
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    I am concerned, phee. This doesn't 'sound' like the usual phoenixoxo, you have had your stuffing knocked out, haven't you? I cannot help on the bloods side of things as I arranged mine at the GPs as I usually do. It takes time to put special arrangements and measures in place which leaves people dangling . . . How and where are your bloods usually done? My surgery set aside an entrance and one room right next to it for use only by those requiring regular blood tests, when I was there on 01 April no other patients were attending which simplified matters. Everyone is feeling their way which is testing the patience of both staff and patients.

    I won't be leaving the house again until the beginning of July and then only for more bloods. Wot larks, Pip. I am thinking of you: onwards and sideways is my motto. DD

    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben
  • phoenixoxo
    phoenixoxo Member Posts: 625
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    Thanks for your kind concern, DD. Yes, I've entered the Flare Zone accompanied by tiredness following the swollen glands episode, so I'm having a bit of a struggle at the moment.

    The good news, though, is that I'm up to date on the work front, so I'll be able to take time off over the next few days. That'll make for a nice change of pace; it's not often that I have a work-free weekend.

    For the blood tests, usually either my carer or my mum drives me in the WAV (wheelchair-accessible vehicle) to the local hospital's outpatients department. I take a ticket and wait for my number to be called by one of the phlebotomists; they're a friendly team. I used to go to my surgery, but once I became a wheelie the Regency-style building proved difficult to negotiate. It's possible they've set up something similar to the arrangements you describe, for patients who don't have my mobility issues. I hope your patience isn't being too sorely tested by anything!

    Thanks for thinking of me, DD; I shall think of thee in return. I hope you'll have plenty of interesting things to do throughout spring and into summer 🌸

    Best wishes,

    Phee

    PsA (psoriatic arthritis) and other things since 1990. Happy to help when I can :-)