Cannabis.

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Beth98
Beth98 Member Posts: 2
edited 23. Apr 2020, 14:01 in Living with arthritis
My name is bethany i am 21 years old i was diagnosed with JIA at 5 years old. Now 21 i have RA and OA. I have recently been to Amsterdam with a friend that enjoys smoking cannabis. I hurd from other people that it helps with the pain and when i was there i had 1 a day for 3 days and omg i have never felt so relaxed and calm and pain free. But i do not want to smoke this daily as i work full time at a care home and live with my mum dad and brother but it seems like the only thing that took the pain away. What are your guys opinion on this please?? And is there anything that helps you guys with the pain??

Hi Bethany, I've deleted your surname from your post as it's something we discourage just from a keeping safe online point of view. Yvonne x

( @YvonneH )

Comments

  • Mike1
    Mike1 Member Posts: 1,992
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    The sooner this is legalised the better so far as I am concerned. I have tried it in the past (I have widespread OA) and was pain free within about 10 minutes and slept well that night. Despite it being illegal I would smoke it now but as I am virtually housebound I have nobody to get it for me and, in any event, I am aware that there are a couple of different strains one of which is stronger and addictive (skunk?). I signed up for a Cannabis trial - 20/21 - but have heard nothing since.

  • Bubble
    Bubble Member Posts: 5
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    Personally I have used it previously and would still be using it if it was available. I think it dulls the pain receptors in the brain hence reducing the pain felt in the body. I expected the benefits to be realised years ago. People with various medical conditions are reluctant to discuss their personal experience due to legal issues. This has to change in order to make any progress on treatment. Sativex is already produced in this country but not currently for arthritis. This article from the BBC in 2004 is very interesting if anyone would like to read it. http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/3790227.stm

  • mac4096
    mac4096 Member Posts: 4
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    I live in Spain where the consumption and growing of marijuana is tolerated within stict guidelines. It must not be seen from the street, you can only consume it at home, you may not carry it around and you must not sell it. This is one of the reasons I moved here five years ago. The other is the dry and warm climate. I grow my own marijuana, smoke it every night before retiring (but not during the day) and make cannabis oil. The oil is, without doubt, the most effective method of pain relief, promotes deep refreshing sleep and by the morning the psychoactive effects have disappeared, allowing normal functioning for work or whatever. I stress I only use it in the evenings before going to bed.

    I have RA and suffered, particularly with my knees, shoulder and neck for years. What I have described above dosen't just make life tolerable it is a return to relative normality and the continued objection of government to make this treatment available is a total nonsense. It could give so many, not just arthritis sufferers, a treatment that is relatively harmless, certainly compared to the toxic prescription drugs. It is a game changer!

    Marijuana has been used for centuries and is well documented by Egyptians for it's medicinal properties. I would add that CBD oils sold in the UK at exorbitant prices is of little use in my experience. You need the full monty including THC which is a vital part of efficacy. What you are paying through the nose for in UK shops (CBD oils) often contains very little beneficial effects.

    It would be wonderful is this web site could start a campaign to legalise the use and growing of marijuana in the UK so that those who know and and understand it's benefits could start making their own product, free from other chemicals and that works, and not be supporting criminals and their activities. It can be grown on tents under full spectrum lights and you should be able to harvest every three to four months.

    Perhaps we can start something going here? We know what it does for epilepsy and it is just as effective for arthritis.

  • OpheliaGB
    OpheliaGB Member Posts: 4
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    I Bethany, have you tried using CBD oil? It comes from the cannabis plant but doesn't contain THC which is the compound which produces the "high" sensation. You can get CBD as oil, gel, cream etc. So you can even use it to apply locally to an area you experience a lot of pain.

    I smoke and vape weed and agree that it pretty much reduces my pain to nothing. I was recommended and started using a few drops of CBD oil before going to bed at night and it greatly helped with my pain in the morning. The taste of CBD oil is quite distinctive however, I started to use drops on mini cheddars, alas now I hate mini cheddars. It may be better instead to drop the oil into water or juice (something with a strong taste?). Hope this helps!

  • Sharon_K
    Sharon_K Member Posts: 460
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    Hi @OpheliaGB

    Welcome to the forums it is lovely to have you here, thank you for sharing your experience of CBD oil. As you will know CBD is type of cannabinoid – a natural substance extracted from the cannabis plant and often mixed with an oil (such as coconut or hemp) to create CBD oil. It does not contain the psychoactive compound called tetrahydrocannabidiol (THC) which is associated with the feeling of being ‘high’.

    Research in cannabinoids over the years suggests that they can be effective in treating certain types of chronic pain such as pain from nerve injury, but there is currently not enough research evidence to support using cannabinoids in reducing musculoskeletal pain. We welcome further research to better understand its impact and are intently following developments internationally.

    CBD oil can be legally bought as a food supplement in the UK from heath food shops and some pharmacies. However, CBD products are not licensed as a medicine for use in arthritis by MHRA (Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Authority) or approved by NICE (National Institute for Health and Care Excellence) or the SMC (Scottish Medicines consortium).

    We know anecdotally that CBD has reduced symptoms for some people. If you’re considering using CBD to manage the pain of your arthritis, it’s important to remember it cannot replace your current medicines, and it may interact with them, so please do not stop/start taking anything without speaking to a healthcare professional.

    Best Wishes

    Sharon

  • Mike1
    Mike1 Member Posts: 1,992
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    I have tried CBD oil, both under the tongue and vaping it, I paid through the nose for supposedly the best form of it. I found it to be absolutely useless and a waste of money.

  • Mike1
    Mike1 Member Posts: 1,992
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    I have tried CBD oil, both under the tongue and vaping it, I paid through the nose for supposedly the best form of it. I found it to be absolutely useless and a waste of money.

  • Airwave!
    Airwave! Member Posts: 2,466
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    As my GP said, “you don’t have to smoke it!” Cake anyone?

  • LADYBLUE
    LADYBLUE Member Posts: 3
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    Cbd is an interesting supplement - for me it doesnt kill the pain but it alters my mindset, perception and handling of the pain. It also really helps my memory - without it I'm in a brain fog of pain and sleeplessness.