Hip resurfacing

Hello,

I am seeking some advice regarding my hip arthritis. Firstly, I know how much others are suffering and in far worse situations than I find myself in.

I am a retired 63-year-old man, diagnosed with moderate osteoarthritis in my hip a year ago. I had symptoms about two years prior to actually getting the diagnosis. It has gradually gotten worse over this period.

I have always been active, running, mountain walking and karate for many years. Now I am a keen long-distance walker and bike rider but finding it more and more difficult to keep up the walking. I can walk for a couple of hours with some pain.

So, my question is whether I should consider trying to get a resurfacing operation for my hip. I have read that generally its recommended for under 60’s but is the best if you wish to remain active. I would like to get back to being able to do long distance hikes in the mountains, not the running or karate. Is this realistic? If so, how do I go about getting it done, will I have to go down the private route and if so what are the costs and options.

Thank you very much

Harry

Comments

  • Chris_R
    Chris_R Moderator Posts: 360
    edited 18. Dec 2020, 17:03

    Hi @harry

    Welcome to the online community glad you have got in contact with us.

    You have a question should you consider resurfing on your hip so you can persue all your enjoyable activitys.Have you had a chat with your GP who will refer you to the orthopaedic Consultants, they will then diagnose and see if the resurfing can take place.

    Here is a link that may help you

    Hope this link and discussions are suitable

    Keep in touch to tell us how you get on

    Christine

  • Lilymary
    Lilymary Member Posts: 1,300

    Hi @harry, I’d suggest a referral to a rheumatologist, or go privately, to review your options. I’d heard the NHS aren’t keen on resurfacing due to low success rate and only short term benefit. My ortho surgeon was very scathing of Andy Murray’s resurfaced hip on the basis that he was ruining all that good work on the tennis court (!) but also because all his patients think thry’ll be able to leap around like a world class tennis player post surgery. He was very keen to disavow me of that idea! His opening line when we first met was “I can’t give you your old life back”. Sadly he’s right, but anything I can claw back from where I am now I’ll be eternally grateful for.

    On the plus side, I know of many who have continued with outdoor activities after total hip replacement, including fell walking, horse riding, skiing and cycling, perhaps not to their pre-arthritis levels, but certainly a huge improvement on pre-op levels. I was a keen fell walker myself, now 61, but can barely even get round the shops now. Looking forward to my new hip!

    Meanwhile, you could look into physio and exercises to support your hip and suitable levels of pain relief to keep you moving, but you may have to rein back on high impact sports (as you suggest) to minimise future damage and avoid inflammation.