The bath is too hard and my arms and legs hurt

Baloo
Baloo Member Posts: 6

What a baffling disease. Whatever the exercise was, the one that kept my arms and legs strong enough for using the bath, it has gone. Whats gone is strange because its not like I don't move around either, because I do, except it's mostly around the house these days. I climb the exercise steps, 12 minutes until out of puff, no problem. I lift the kettle to brew up regular, multiple times a day, a bit of a struggle, but I'm a man, I can do it. But step into an empty bathtub, and I can't get in. It might as well be crawling with tomb raiding spiders, or carved from carbon dioxide ice. Can anybody cure this Ablutophobia.

Comments

  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 26,243

    I can't cure your arthritis, Baloo, but your bath problem could be solved by a bath lift. I used one for years until I got my walk-in shower. Have a look here though lots of other disability shops are available. https://www.completecareshop.co.uk/bathroom-aids/bath-lifts/electric-bath-lifts

    "The deeper sorrow carves into your being the more joy you can contain." Kahlil Gibran
  • Baloo
    Baloo Member Posts: 6

    Yes stickywicket. Trying to decide on a suitable modification like a chair makes me feel nervous too. I'm warming to the idea that a daily visit to the bath to exercise appropriate movements might solve it.

  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 26,243

    Why not enlist the help of an occupational therapist? You can self-refer by looking up your local council's Adult Social Care Dept.

    "The deeper sorrow carves into your being the more joy you can contain." Kahlil Gibran
  • Baloo
    Baloo Member Posts: 6

    Escalating to an occupational therapist is an interesting idea @stickywicket. Gaining strength for anything special in between relapses is a bit of a challenge. It's such a short time to get fit, something like 10 days.

  • Baloo
    Baloo Member Posts: 6

    Still working on how to get in and out the bath @stickywicket . I'm unlikely to qualify for social care occupational therapist as it needs two things I can't do, but I will ask anyway and see what they say. Meanwhile I found some arm and leg squat exercises I can do without much difficulty. What really gets me (so far) is being too stiff to sit on my knees in the bath or even get up and down off the floor. Maybe I can get the flexibility back if I keep trying things out. Its not like the floor is no longer there any more, it most certainly is.

  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 26,243

    Try googling 'Bathing Aids' and see if there's anything that would help.

    "The deeper sorrow carves into your being the more joy you can contain." Kahlil Gibran
  • DebbieD
    DebbieD Member Posts: 2

    Yes, my OT said to self refer to social services and ask for a home assessment. They may be able to advise and help with small adaptations.

    I have a shower over my bath and bought a bath board (goes across the sides of the bath), and a grippy mat for in the bath. I then sit on the side of the board and swivel round and lift my legs over the side of the bath whilst sitting. It feels pretty secure. If I’m feeling good I stand to shower (I still could use having a grab rail fitted). If not I sit and shower. Getting out I sit, swivel and lift my legs over. I have a bath step with a handle to help me get out as my feet don’t touch the ground. So that’s how I shower.

    i really miss having a bath and am trying to work out if there is a safe way of moving from the bath board into the bath and then using it to lean on to stand back up. There are options of in bath chair thingies but I’m not sure about them yet.

  • crinkly
    crinkly Member Posts: 64

    Like stickywicket I have a simple bath-lift that sits inside the bath and has a seat that can be set level with the top of the bath so you use in the same way as DebbieD's cross-bath board. A rechargeable battery then allows me to lower the seat until I'm just a fraction above the bottom of the bath and the back-rest reclines so I can enjoy the warm water on my back. Not precisely the same as having an independent bath but very close and easy to use - especially if you have a little more depth of water in the bath than usual.

    In addition to a home assessment you might visit a disability showroom and ask to see what commercial options are available - there are a number of variations and not all are too expensive to be achievable with a bit of extra saving. (I used my DLA.)

  • Mike1
    Mike1 Member Posts: 1,720

    I had a home assessment from the Council Adult Care department and ended up with a wet room being put in for me complete with a seat in the shower, a raised WC and handrails etc. In addition other adaptations were made around my bungalow.