Hip Surgery

With hip surgery listed for a little over a week away I have been hit with feelings of shock and trauma at the thought of having surgery and how this may affect me emotionally and psychologically long term. Can you help me please?

Comments

  • PeterJ
    PeterJ Moderator Posts: 512
    edited 28. Jan 2022, 09:25

    Hi @buzzyhornet , see the below link, it might help

    Wishing you all the best

    Peter (moderator)

  • Hi Buzzyhornet

    Thank you for your posting on the forum. I am so sorry to hear that you have been hit with feelings of shock and trauma at the thought of having surgery and how this may affect your emotional wellbeing in the long term. It is not unusual to be concerned about having surgery and I see that Peter has sent you a link to our information on emotional well being that talks about the impact of having arthritis on our emotions. I would like to encourage you to call us here on the Helpline where you can talk to one of our Helpline advisors about your concerns, we are open from 9am – 6pm Monday to Friday and our contact number is 0800 5200 520.

     

    Most people who have hip replacements notice an improvement in their overall quality of life and mobility. Our information on Hip Replacement Surgery talks about preparing for surgery and how you can prepare for recovery after the surgery. Some hospitals run joint schools and research shows that people who take part in these classes tend to be less worried about surgery and do better after.

     

    It may be that as your surgery is soon that you have already attended the pre admission clinic. Making sure you are prepared for your recovery may help. You may have spoken to a physiotherapist about exercises you will need to do after the operation and an occupational therapist who will discuss with you how you will manage at home in the weeks after your operation, though these may not so available due to the covid situation. There is more information on recovery and preparing for surgery in our information below. Also, you could speak to your GP about how you are feeling and your concerns and discuss how they can support you.  

     

    I hope that this information is helpful to you.

     

    Hip Replacement Surgery

    Very Best Wishes

    Dawn Smith

    Helpline Advisor



     

  • Lilymary
    Lilymary Member Posts: 1,514
    edited 28. Jan 2022, 15:26

    Hi @buzzyhornet , I found the easiest way to deal with the pre-op anxiety was to block out what they were actually going to do to me. The docs know what they're doing, and me worrying about it won't change what they do. I made a point of not looking up the gruesome details on the internet. At the same time, I was planning for what I do would to make life easier when I got home. Focussing on that will take your mind off the hospital bit, and is something positive and constructive to do rather than sitting worrying. As Peter and Dawn have said, the occupational therapist/physios will make sure you have the basic equipment ready before you go in (raised toilet seats, trolley etc, and will give you a few bits before you leave the hospital (crutches, grabber, sock slider etc). I also used a soft shoulder bag to carrying things round the house (water bottle, books, pills etc) and had plenty of soft pillows to sit and lie on, as your rump will be a bit tender for a while.

    As for post op trauma? Most people I know are so delighted to be pain free that there is little or no trauma from the op itself. I asked to be fully sedated so I didn't know anything about the surgery until I came round int he recovery ward, and the staff took very good care of me from thereon until discharge.

    Honestly, it's more scary thinking about it than actually going through it. Try to find nice things to distract yourself meanwhile, particularly if you feel the anxiety building up. Or come on here and we'll do our best to hold your hand. LM x

  • Coddfish
    Coddfish Member Posts: 85

    Hi @buzzyhornet I remember going into my surgery with a strange mix of feelings. Fear and anxiety, but also excitement that I was about to start a journey towards recovery. Try to keep yourself busy over the next few days by making sure you have everything ready for your return home. @Lilymary mentions some of the equipment you will need - there are various stories on this site of things people have found helpful. Her experience of occupational therapists taking care of everything wasn’t my experience - I was given info at my pre-op as to what would be useful, but then left to get on with it. So don’t make assumptions about what will happen.

    For most of us, the benefits are immediate and enormous. Whilst you may well go through a few rough weeks, you will soon be feeling better. It’s been one of the best decisions I have ever made.

  • pmas
    pmas Member Posts: 36

    Hi @buzzyhornet, my first total hip replacement is next week 3 Feb. The date came through with quite short notice as the hospital (NHS) have a only just been given permission to re-start elective surgery.

    So on receiving the phone call from the hospital to see if I would be available on 3 Feb, I felt so excited. I was so happy that something was being done. The letter arrived the next day with reams of instructions and advice and PCR appointments and pre-op appointments - I felt quite overwhelmed. Now I’ve had the pre-op and will have PCR on Monday followed by isolation until the op. It all feels very, very real, especially after the possible complications were pointed out. But I have total trust in my Consultant, he wouldn’t be doing these two operations if they weren’t necessary. Every member of staff I’ve had dealings with so far have shown great empathy and understanding, as well as being very efficient of course. I have to trust them - they are the ones who will change my life for the better!

    Now I’m feeling excited that the first hip is being done with the other hip being done 12 weeks later. I know it’s going to be hard work, especially as I can’t weightbear on either hip at the moment. The reality is that I will have a slightly longer hospital stay until they are happy with my mobility. I’ve stocked up with books, sewing, jigsaws etc and plan to take each day as it comes and resist trying to rush my recovery. This whole episode has been a rollercoaster of emotions probably because this has all happened so quickly, but this is the first time that I can see a way out - and I can’t wait to get going!

    I really hope your op and recovery go well. Patx

  • buzzyhornet
    buzzyhornet Member Posts: 20

    Hello @Lilymary thank you for posting and for your helpful reply. Unfortunately I looked up the gruesome details on the internet, although it is difficult to escape them even on recognised sites, and I am finding the thought of the loss of the head of my femur particularly difficult to accept. Doubly unfortunate, in this context, is the fact that I am still managing my pain which manifests as more like gnawing discomfort when I walk a distance, and I fear I may be in more pain after the operation than I am now! I know my long term wellbeing is bound up with having the operation, but I am struggling to come to terms with being cut open, loss of bone and replacement implant. It all feels so unnatural and sorry to use his word, but it is how I feel, repugnantz, Sorry to be so negative, I can try to distract myself, but post op and how I will then feel really worries me. Please do hold my hand. Thank you Dx.

  • buzzyhornet
    buzzyhornet Member Posts: 20


  • buzzyhornet
    buzzyhornet Member Posts: 20

    Thanks @Coddfish. I think the fact that I can still manage ny arthritis heightens my concern and I do find the thought of what happens during surgery repugnant! I probably need a mind reset and I am glad it has been a good decision for you.

  • buzzyhornet
    buzzyhornet Member Posts: 20

    Hello @pmas thank you for posting and posting so positively. I am sure your positivity will see you through and it is example to me! I hope Pat ( my sister's name ) that everything goes well for you on the 3rd. Best wishes David

  • Coddfish
    Coddfish Member Posts: 85

    @buzzyhornet I find thinking of my shiny new body parts as an upgrade helps! They work magnificently, you can’t feel them. I can’t see the scar without looking in a mirror so it’s largely out of sight, out of mind.

  • Lilymary
    Lilymary Member Posts: 1,514

    Honestly, once it’s bedded in you really won’t notice the difference other than the scar and lack of pain in your hip. To me the scar is a small price to pay to be rid of the 24/7 pain and loss of mobility in the joint. As @Coddfish says, the metal bits are an upgrade on what your body produced naturally.

  • buzzyhornet
    buzzyhornet Member Posts: 20

    @Coddfish and @lilymary. Thank you for your reassurance and encouragement.

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