What should I do?

TLee
TLee Member Posts: 86
edited 10. Jan 2024, 20:24 in Living with arthritis

January is my month for annual/semi annual dr visits. I see 2 specialists, nothing to do with arthritis, but I also have an appointment with my primary care dr. I actually canceled an appointment about 6 months back because I was tired of getting nowhere in finding relief for my severe hip OA. I tried the shot (worked--sort of--for less than a week). Then it was PT, which ended after around 6 visits when I had made all the improvement (almost none) that seemed possible. The last visit had the dr suggesting the same things all over again, and I just sort of gave up. I have been trying to make the best of the hip situation by continuing to stay active and, frankly, just getting used to the pain. The upcoming visit is just to check in, although they always ask if I have any specific concerns. So what should I do: Admit that the hip is still quite painful and see what else they have to say, or accept that they still won't have any real help to offer & say nothing about it?

Comments

  • Nurina
    Nurina Member Posts: 185

    @TLee I think you should have a x-ray done to see in what stage of OA you are now and then, decide what to do.

  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 27,686

    If it were me, I'd go and explain how it is but with no expectations of anything new. That way your doc knows the score. And you're not too disappointed. Just occasionally I've found, in that situation, that they do actually come up with something. I've always found that physio, unless after eg an op, was to slow down the deterioration not actually improve anything though it can lessen pain. It can be a hard, joyless slog but worth a go and, yes, as @Nurina suggests, an x-ray might be useful.

    If at first you don't succeed, then skydiving definitely isn't for you.
    Steven Wright
  • TLee
    TLee Member Posts: 86

    I had x-rays a while back--severe, bone-on-bone in left hip, along with some age-related deterioration in lumbar spine. Some days I feel every bit of it! I reached a point, around the time I temporarily deserted my primary care, when I felt that if I have to go it alone, then I will do anything and everything I can to feel better. I lost some weight and went back to the PT exercises with a vengeance. **Maybe I need to do a testimonial here that it really does help with both pain and, if not movement exactly, at least stability. So my inclination is to just keep that up and not look for a medical miracle. In a way, I guess I've already answered my own question! It's just that I have felt let down and yes, even ignored by doctors, and my instinct is to keep making noise until I feel heard. I almost think that I want them to just OFFER more help, and might even turn it down--surgery is scary and drugs are not my thing--but can't they just show some real concern?

    So my real question for discussion is: How many of us are making do with minimal treatment (by choice or because docs don't offer more), and what is your experience?

  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 27,686

    I think the fact that you're doing all you can in losing weight and exercising shows you're doing your bit and therefore I'd stick with my original thought above. If offered anything, in ops or meds, that you don't fancy, you can always politely decline and say why. They might have a Plan B.

    As for you 're revised' question - quite a lot of us, I'd guess. . Over here in UK, our NHS is creaking and in need of surgery every bit as much as we are. I'm officially inoperable now - well, the offending ancient THR ànd geriatric TKR (of 1981 vintage) below it are but no-one is to blame. The 'big guns' have done MRIs ànd CTs but, although they would happily make a customised THR, the one in situ has travelled too dangerously close to my pelvis. My problem is just life. Which is still good.

    I do hope you can decide on a course of action, or even inaction, with which uou'll feel comfortable. Good luck.

    If at first you don't succeed, then skydiving definitely isn't for you.
    Steven Wright
  • Chris1
    Chris1 Member Posts: 40

    Geriatric TKR ( of 1981 vintage) . Please explain. Concerned as I'm just recovering from a TKR.

  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 27,686

    Sorry, I thought I was being clear. The TKR that is totally moribund was put in in 1981 ie 43 years ago. It's served me well and I'd have another tomorrow if I could. Just do your exercises and don't rush things. You'll be fine. I was.

    If at first you don't succeed, then skydiving definitely isn't for you.
    Steven Wright
  • I was on a lot of drugs including and over night had no choice but to stop them. As I was diagnosed with gastroparesis, it has been a long hard road for 3 years learning to introduce foods and living on no pain relief as my stomach condition was cause from medication.

    I am no in a better place and have had no choice but to learn other ways to cope with chronic pain, I have my Tens machine and belt. Heat pads and support belts/straps. I found exercise and enjoy walking out my pain, I find being outside relaxing and refreshing. I don't get house bound alot, so had to find thing to keep my mind off pain, that was hard, but I have done it.

    The only medication I really needed was for my central sensitization syndrome nerve damage and I have it in my whole body, but 4 weeks ago I started a new medication and it is working. Which make coping with my normal pains much easier. I'm over weight and have poor mobility, but like you all, will continue fighting and supporting other through there journey. Every little thing we try, even if we don't succeed is a possitive and we learn our limits, you should pat yourselves on the back