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Long car journey..... any suggestions?

hels78hels78 Posts: 60
edited 28. Jan 2009, 04:08 in Living with Arthritis archive
I am facing a long car journey from Suffolk to Glasgow on Friday and am looking for some suggestions how to cope! This is the longest journey I've done since my RA took a turn for the worst and I'm terrified :cry: . I've done all I can to get out of going but with no luck.
So, wise people, what can I do to make this a more bearable journey? Thanks in advance, Helen xx

Comments

  • frogmortonfrogmorton Posts: 25,631 ✭✭✭
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Oh Helen!
    I don't envy you!
    The only thing I can say is:
    1. Make sure they stop and let you get out regularly
    2. Take your painkillers 1/2 hour before you go
    3. Get those heat packs that heat up on your body 'cura heat'
    4. Take all the pillows you need
    and GOOD LUCK!!!
    sorry not much help
    Take care
    Toni x
    Love

    Toni xxx
  • michelle22michelle22 Posts: 93
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I don't envy you at all what I would do is make sure that you are in the back so you can at least change positions and stop a lot don't just sit there in pain and say nothing. I was hoping to go down to my sisters but can't as it takes 8 hours and I am the driver so I won't be doing that lol.

    I hope that you manage to do it and please don't spend all of the time that you are up here in Scotland worrying how you are going to get back
  • suzievsuziev Posts: 252
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    no advice for the arthritis sorry.... but a portable DVD player may take your mind of your body, nothing worse then sitting thinking about it.

    have a good time in scotland though
    xx
  • slummymummyslummymummy Posts: 69
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    My only advice would be DON'T DO IT! Can't you fly instead???? It must be at least 7hrs drive from Suffolk to Glasgow. Sounds like torture! Even if you are only a passenger.

    I did a 4 hour drive, with my parents driving, to a big family gathering that I just couldn't bear to miss. I was an absolute wreck. The pain was like labour pain (I'm not exaggerating) and I just writhed and groaned, between stops. At one point my husband phone to see if I was OK, and I burst into tears and couldn't speak (it was so wonderful to hear his voice). And that was with max painkillers and steroids. It took me at least a week to recover. :cry::cry::cry:

    Make your excuses and get out of it. Or hire a private jet. :!: :!:
  • hels78hels78 Posts: 60
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi all, thanks for the help and suggestions. I am the passenger, hubbie is driving so luckily will be sympathetic to my need to stop. Unfortunately I haven't got a dvd played to take, or know of anyone who has one I can borrow.
    It is a family reunion for hubbies family so can't really get out of it and his sister has dumped her buggy on us to take which has filled our boot, meaning our stuff will have to go on the back seat and I'll be stuck in the front. Am going to wear my slippers for comfort and take my fleece blanket to keep me warm ( have some of those cura heat packs somewhere too), will dose up on meds as well. Sigh 7 hours in the car just depresses me and to top it off we are only there till sunday am, so it hardly seems worth it!
  • mash65mash65 Posts: 834
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    hels78 wrote:
    Hi all, thanks for the help and suggestions. I am the passenger, hubbie is driving so luckily will be sympathetic to my need to stop. Unfortunately I haven't got a dvd played to take, or know of anyone who has one I can borrow.
    It is a family reunion for hubbies family so can't really get out of it and his sister has dumped her buggy on us to take which has filled our boot, meaning our stuff will have to go on the back seat and I'll be stuck in the front. Am going to wear my slippers for comfort and take my fleece blanket to keep me warm ( have some of those cura heat packs somewhere too), will dose up on meds as well. Sigh 7 hours in the car just depresses me and to top it off we are only there till sunday am, so it hardly seems worth it!
    i know how u feel recently went leicester 2 cornwall only 4/half hrs but was hell.i took a cushion 2 put behind my neck.took meds b4 we left,bottle of water 4 more meds.but we only got 70 miles b4 we had 2 stop[felt sick] luckily i had my sickness tabs with me.just make sure u have everything u need 2 hand b4 u leave & good luck. hopefully it'll b better than u think.try not 2 think about it 2 much i did & it made me feel worst,did everything 2 get out of going but after the yr i've had i need the break. best wishes deb
  • livinglegendlivinglegend Posts: 1,425
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    When we go on our hols we do travel long distance by car and a little preparation can help. 8)

    Always sit in the front seats, as they are better built and supportive than the back ones. :D If you are the passenger, NOT the driver, then lie the seat slightly back and pack under you with cushions or pillows. This takes a lot of the bumps and vibration out. But, not too many for safety. :shock:

    Regular stops at service areas are a necessity not a luxury.

    :idea: Rather than try to cover the distance in one run, consider staying at a small B&B part way. This will give you a night's break away from travelling and there are many reasonably priced places a few minutes away from main roads or motorways. :arrow: Email or phone ahead and ask if they have special arrangements for disabled people. Usually there is a room at road level with easy access which can be reserved for you. :D

    If you feel well enough, then a visit to a local pub for a bar meal of the local fresh produce, it is worth it just for the taste. :lol:

    I would also suggest a private jet, buttttttttttttt! :P (fill in your own reasons here).

    Joseph 8)
    Josephm0310.gif
  • garagefluffygaragefluffy Posts: 15
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    When my kids were small we always travellend overnight long distances, they went to bed once and woke up in France still in pj's!
    Since your body is more likely to be naturally at rest at night would it be worth trying to drive up then?
    Jax
  • WonkylegsWonkylegs Posts: 3,504
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Wow - the best of luck!

    I find that regular (every hour - 90 mins) are essential.
    Also a supply of meds, pillows, splints etc all help.

    Also, I always have plenty of drinks with us. I fill a flask with hot water and take the makings for all sorts of drinks with me. That way I know I can get a drink whenever I need one without breaking the bank. Getting out to get the stuff out of the boot is the best way i've found of helping me get moving and ward off stiffness.

    Leave yourself plenty of time for the journey.
    If you are staying overnight (you must be!!! :roll: ) then I do suggest you take your own pillows. I have stopped feeling embarrassed about this as I knwo I will get a decent sleep - that helps with coping too!

    hope all goes well!
  • livinglegendlivinglegend Posts: 1,425
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    When my kids were small we always travellend overnight long distances, they went to bed once and woke up in France still in pj's!
    Since your body is more likely to be naturally at rest at night would it be worth trying to drive up then?
    Jax

    It is the best way if possible. though the driver can look a bit :shock:

    Years ago I had a motorcaravan. The kids and partner, late evening, were packed into bed :):):) in the Midlands. THEY woke up with a wonderful view of the Forth Railway Bridge. :lol::lol::lol:
    I woke much later to the smell of cooking bacon and eggies. :D What a life.

    Joseph 8)
    Josephm0310.gif
  • magentamagenta Posts: 1,604
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hello Helen,
    Did you make it to Glasgow? How was the journey-not too bad I hope! Weather was good :shock:
    Magenta x
  • hels78hels78 Posts: 60
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi all, thanks for the advice.
    We left at 5.15am on Friday and arrived in Glasgow at 2pm - no sooner as we hit Glasgow it rained, hailed and rained a bit more and continued to do so until we were half way home! :shock: The drive wasn't bad really, we stopped mainly for the loo rather than me needing to. I was wearing my slippers and had a blanket and pillow, kept on top of my meds and drank plenty.
    Wasn't so good whilst there, didn't sleep a wink the first night - am never good away from home - so felt lousy the saturday, plus the cold and rain didn't help.
    Trip home Sunday again was good, we stopped in Sheffield to visit a friend so had a 2 hour break and got home at 7pm. Still not feeling quite right and am also still catching up on the sleep but am proud that I did it! Thanks all, your help was much appreciated xx
  • slummymummyslummymummy Posts: 69
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi Helen,

    I know that this was a long time ago now, but did you make the trip? How did it go??

    Slummy
  • hels78hels78 Posts: 60
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi slummymummy, please see post above yours!
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