Hello

Diandra83
Diandra83 Member Posts: 16
edited 17. Jun 2012, 08:29 in Say Hello Archive
Hi Everyone,

I have never did anything like this before and I am petrified so I will apologise just now for what will follow!!
I am a 28 year old female who up until christmas was exactly what you would expect from a young women of my age, my life was carzy juggling my daughter who is 8 and work and of course my social life! I was so busy planning to return to uni and attempting to organise a wedding and christmas that I never even realised I wasnt feeling well until one day I woke up and what had been slight niggling in my shoulder and hip was now so bad I couldn't get myself dressed or manage to do the most basic of tasks. I have now been diagnosed with inflammatory arthritis and despite being put on medication my condition is worsening rather than improving.
The thing I find the most difficult is relying on people as I have always been very independent but I am determined this is not going to take over my entire life!! As my wee granny would say - that that doesn't kill you only makes you stronger!!

Comments

  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,557
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hello, it's nice to meet you and I am glad you have found us. I am in my sixteenth year of inflammatory arthritis, mine is PsA (psoriatic) and that has led in turn to OA (osteo). None of it is pleasant. :wink: What medication have you been given? The good news is that you have been diagnosed quickly and put onto meds but these can take up to three months to 'kick in'. I hope you will have a look around the forum: LWA (Living with Arthritis) is the bit where we deal with the meds, doctors, appointments etc, the other titles are self-explanantory. It's pretty quiet at the week-ends so don't give up if you don't have many replies, everyone will be back on Monday. Take care. DD

    PS This was my first forum too!
    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben
  • Diandra83
    Diandra83 Member Posts: 16
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Thank you!! I am terrified being on here, it feels like the first day of school!!! It will be great to go somewhere that people actually understand exactly whats happening!
    Well at the moment i am on sulfasalazine and methotrexate and I am also getting steroid injections into my joints but there has been very little improvement, although the clinic i attend is amazing and I have been seeing my nurse every 2weeks! The niggling pain actually started around 18months ago but my GP at the time kept dismissing me. I ended up changing my GP and the new one refered me straight away. Around 15years ago I suffered from JIA (Juvenille idiopathic arthritis) which i grew out of however now this has happened and they believe its all connected.

    16years is a long time, you will be a pro at managing it all!!
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,557
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    There is no need to be terrified, we are a friendly bunch and if you take your time reading a few posts here and there I am sure you will get the 'feel' for our various 'characters' ! The one thing that unites (and affects) us all is arthritis in all its forms and guises, the OAers don't have the meds etc that the inflammatory bods do but having both sorts I know that OA pain is a very different beast to the other.

    Meth and sulph are the usual starter meds, I began with sulph in 2002 and I am still on it now. Initially it caused quite a bit of bruising but my body soon adjusted. I now do my own meth injections which is a doddle (though daunting at first) as I do not tolerate the tablets that well. My PsA began in my left knee in 1997 and it has spread but every one's arthritis is unique to them, no-one can predict how yours will be. The meds are designed to suppress the immune system to stop it from 'firing up' - it's that process which leads your body to effectively 'attack' itself. Given your history of JIA I guess you know some of this already! :wink: It is important to fully rest a joint after a steroid injection - my hospital has always told me to go to bed for 48 hours (I have my knees and ankles done) and I do but I have never had that much benefit from them.

    Be conscientious about the blood tests, they are very important. Have you been given a meth booklet in which they are recorded? Another aspect of arthritis which takes people aback is the tiredness that can affect one. I know when a flare might be on the way as I suddenly find myself needing an afternoon nap. I am fortunate with work inasmuch as I am self-employed and I can tailor things according to what I need. Don't ignore the tiredness - your body is telling you to rest and I hope you will be able to do just that, though with an eight year old I guess that is going to be tricky.

    I began my arthritis aged 37, I am now 53. I've learned a lot about it all over the years but finding here was a true blessing: up unitl then I was on my own coping with it, I did not know any arthritics (none of my friends are affected by it, neither is my husband though he does get blasts of gout every now and again) and I value this place very much indeed. The information, friendship and support is amazing. DD
    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben
  • Diandra83
    Diandra83 Member Posts: 16
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I haven't been given a booklet to record such things - I will find out about that time I am there!! Lol it is kinda like that - the JIA was an introduction to what was to come!!
    I am very lucky in that I have an amazingly supportive family who live close to me and my daughters school and since my cousins have finished uni for the summer they are on "sprog duty" as i like to call it!!
    Unfortunatley I had to stop working but I am hoping to be going back to uni in sept to do a postgrad and my nurse is amazing, she is trying to get me all the help, info and support I need!!
    The biggest problem at the moment is my mobility as I have a walking stick and can't really get out myself since I have taken a lovely tendency to falling!! Plus my bathroom is begining to look like an old folks home with special equipment to make everything a bit easier - thankfully my humour isn't gone and I can still laugh! xx
    You have been very helpful thank you so much xx
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,557
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Ah. mobility, I remember that well. I have been on crutches since 2002 and last December I invested in a four-wheeled rollator which has made a terrific difference to my stamina. I can last up to a couple of hours in town now as it has a seat and I can rest whenever I need - I can queue again! For the bathroom I have a raised toilet seat which is a boon and a grab handle that works by suction: it doesn't have to be on display the whole time and it's there should I need it. These things are necessary to help us and they do: they are designed for the job unlike washbasins and radiators! I hope you are having a reasonable day. DD
    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben