Swimming is good for us, as we all know :)

elnafinn
elnafinn Member Posts: 8,043
edited 31. Oct 2012, 16:50 in Living with Arthritis archive
The happiest people don't have the best of everything. They just make the best of everything.

If you can lay down at night knowing in your heart that you made someone's day just a little bit better, you know you had a good day.

Comments

  • wall1409
    wall1409 Member Posts: 294
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I was told off for going swimming by Physio as unless I can swim with head under water I am putting too much pressure on neck with spine, gutted as I used to love it
  • elnafinn
    elnafinn Member Posts: 8,043
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi there! Yes, I remember your posting well as I too only do breast stoke - just about - and always have to have my head above the water. :roll: I have spinal probs too. You could float or exercise in the water, holding onto the bars instead perhaps. I suppose we could go for some swimming lessons to learn to put our head in the water! Cycling in the water sounds like fun, have not heard about that before.

    Elna x
    The happiest people don't have the best of everything. They just make the best of everything.

    If you can lay down at night knowing in your heart that you made someone's day just a little bit better, you know you had a good day.
  • salamander
    salamander Member Posts: 2,028
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I have a choice of going to my filthy local leisure pool during limited hours and competing, unsuccessfully, with macho swimmers in tiny lanes (have been known to come home with bruises) or infinitely better, not as local, pool in neighbouring borough at £4.30 a time. I was swimming 3 x a week but at that price it works out expensive.

    As I live out of the borough (though within walking distance) I can't get a lower price to the latter. There's something ridiculous about London where you have to access services in your borough even if they are miles away, as in my case, and you live on the edge of another one.
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,558
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I can't get in and out of our local pool due to the vertical, wide-spaced steps. I don't qualify for the hydraulic lift as I'm not wheelchair bound. I'm not allowed in the mothers and toddlers as I lack a toddler. The drying and changing after in a tiny cubicle is not easy without repeatedly banging one's arthritic elbows, and as for the stupid lockers . . . . . Credit where credit is due however, the disabled access to the pool is lovely.

    When I win the lottery I think a private pool (with a gently sloped entrance / exit) will be on the cards. You will all be welcome to use it free of charge. (Note to self, start doing the lottery.) DD
    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben
  • fowls48
    fowls48 Member Posts: 1,357
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    swim like a brick me :shock: :oops:
  • barbara12
    barbara12 Member Posts: 21,094
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi Elna
    Im another that can only do the breast stroke...and very badly..what a good idea having lesson to teach us to do the crawl...
    Love
    Barbara
  • salamander
    salamander Member Posts: 2,028
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    dreamdaisy wrote:
    I can't get in and out of our local pool due to the vertical, wide-spaced steps. I don't qualify for the hydraulic lift as I'm not wheelchair bound. I'm not allowed in the mothers and toddlers as I lack a toddler. The drying and changing after in a tiny cubicle is not easy without repeatedly banging one's arthritic elbows, and as for the stupid lockers . . . . . Credit where credit is due however, the disabled access to the pool is lovely.

    When I win the lottery I think a private pool (with a gently sloped entrance / exit) will be on the cards. You will all be welcome to use it free of charge. (Note to self, start doing the lottery.) DD

    I'm surprised they won't lift you and in and out of the pool DD. Surely they are meant to help anyone? Don't know why pools aren't designed better.
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,558
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    They won't because I can 'walk' ergo to their way of thinking I can get in and out. :lol: Twerps. I know it's good exercise but I freeely admit the potential pitfalls (and pratfalls) put me off. DD
    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben
  • elnafinn
    elnafinn Member Posts: 8,043
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    barbara12 wrote:
    Hi Elna
    Im another that can only do the breast stroke...and very badly..what a good idea having lesson to teach us to do the crawl...

    Hi Barbara

    My daughter does breast stroke with her face in the water. Thanks to her mum :wink::D she went to swimming lessons as a youngster! She loves swimming and has back problems.

    Elna x
    The happiest people don't have the best of everything. They just make the best of everything.

    If you can lay down at night knowing in your heart that you made someone's day just a little bit better, you know you had a good day.
  • barbara12
    barbara12 Member Posts: 21,094
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Elna I do wish I had learned to swim when young..I was in my 40s...and I still struggle...but now I find my hips are really painful after....still never say never...you have given something to think about.. :D
    Love
    Barbara
  • gilly1957
    gilly1957 Member Posts: 212
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I adore swimming and have done since i was a child...

    I also qualified as a lifeguard and swimming teacher when my kids were young.

    My youngest, who is now 23, could swim before he could walk.

    I went swimming a few weeks ago, but cannot do front crawl anymore,only breaststroke, not good for my back i'v been told.

    I hate walking from the changing rooms to the pool, feel like everyone's thinking look at her fat lump lol.

    Im thinking i may try aquafit i used to do it years ago and it does'nt put a strain on body as water is supporting you .
  • ShulaArcher
    ShulaArcher Member Posts: 174
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi everyone

    I've been going for swimming lessons and find my tutor absolutely wonderful - she understands what is best for different joint problems and is currently trying her best to get me to swim breast stroke but with "front crawl legs", keeping my face in the water as much as possible. I'm a nervous swimmer so need a lot of encouragement. She also is encouraging me to get used to being on my back as this is the best way for a swimmer's back to be straight and puts the least strain on it.

    The Consultant I saw last week also told me not to do breast stroke unless I was keeping my face down as much as possible as holding my head up would be a strain on my cervical spine.

    Having said all that, I know I've got to persevere as it's the best exercise for me. By the way, the water is quite warm - another bonus.

    Also, I'm intending to go to Aqua aerobics when I feel strong enough!

    Shula
  • elnafinn
    elnafinn Member Posts: 8,043
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Good for your Shula, what courage! I like to swim on my back but then I cannot really see where you are going. :roll: :wink: I am a nervous swimmer and like to keep to in the depth I am happy with.

    Keep up the good work, you are doing great, I am most impressed. :)

    Elna x
    The happiest people don't have the best of everything. They just make the best of everything.

    If you can lay down at night knowing in your heart that you made someone's day just a little bit better, you know you had a good day.
  • phoenixoxo
    phoenixoxo Member Posts: 625
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    fowls48 wrote:
    swim like a brick me :shock: :oops:

    Love that :lol:

    Swimming is good, but a lot of swimming pools don't provide adequately for disability, whether that's equipment to help people into the water, comfortable changing rooms, or even proper access, as DD has found. Before the assault on my leg I was able to use a local pool, but my new set of problems means this is no longer possible, worse luck.

    For those that are able to take a dip, though, go for it! :)

    Best wishes,
    Phoebe
    PsA (psoriatic arthritis) and other things since 1990. Happy to help when I can :-)
  • PowerOn
    PowerOn Member Posts: 200
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I used to love swimming until the neck pain got too bad, swimming underwater is a good way past it, a really good trick is to hold lightly onto the side of the pool on your back and gently kick your legs from below the knee is enough, so you move a little, this way you can get to the other end of the pool with no strain and totally weightless, really recommend trying it, as long as no one jumps on top of you from the side you're on to a winner!
    Yes, I got landed next to, not a direct hit but both he and I nearly swallowed the pool in shock, look before you leap please!
    Look out for a marker on the ceiling so you know when you need to stop before you bump your head.
    Best joke I ever read, "With that information and a diagnosis of spondylosis, your doctor can develop a treatment plan‏" or back in reality totally ignore you. Is ok I have a sense of humour and a boxing glove, not defeated yet.