Ghosts

stickywicket
stickywicket Member Posts: 26,708
edited 4. Aug 2014, 11:05 in Community Chit-chat archive
I mean real ones ie people who haunt us a little.

Yesterday we passed through a village we only go through rarely. I instantly recalled the time we saw a young woman walking slowly along the grass verge there weeping quietly. I would have stopped the car but Mr SW is made of sterner stuff.

I think of her every time we go through that village. Who was she? What had happened? Did it all get sorted? Is she happy now?

Comments

  • barbara12
    barbara12 Member Posts: 21,258
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    How sad, bet you will never forget this..I do believe in ghost...but its a very long story..could you not do some research of the area.. :)
  • bubbadog
    bubbadog Member Posts: 5,544
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I believe in ghosts and Spirits as I've been visited by late family members, they don't scare me. When my sister and I saw spiritualist she said I had an angel watching over me keeping me safe. I'm not to sure if I believe in them but I have had a few close calls over the last few years!!
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 26,708
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I didn't mean ghosts in the normally accepted sense of the word just people whom we probably never really knew, cross our minds when a place or situation or just an object brings them rushing to the forefront.

    Pendle Hill always reminds me of the Lancashire Witches. I consider I had a lucky escape having RA in the 20th and 21st centuries. I'm sure my limbs would have marked me as a witch in earlier times and, my attempts at herbal pain relief would just have reinforced that.
  • LignumVitae
    LignumVitae Member Posts: 1,972
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I know just what you mean. On our honeymoon in York (we are very rock and roll) Mr LV and I were sitting on a wall in the January evening and a young soldier on R and R came to chat to us (I think it started with him getting a light off us). He intended to walk away but got chatting because Mr LVs accent took his fancy and then he spent about an hour pouring his heart out about how dreadful Afganistan was, how all he could do on leave was get severely drunk because he felt lost and none of his family or friends understood what he had seen and how it felt. He really opened up to us andr LV did his best to advise and counsel and after a while he cheered up, smiled and wandered off into the night. I often wondered how he is, how war affected him further and maybe how not being at war, how struggling to readjust affected him and his future.
  • mig
    mig Member Posts: 7,152
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Several years ago when our son lived in America we were over visiting it happened to be Memorial Day and we went into Washington ,they have some beautiful memorials and gardens one of them being the Korean one it has a wall with names written on it ,which are within easy reach the families of soldiers that lost there lives they can come and just touch the names or take rubbings ,all this is encouraged and nobody has yet defaced the memorial,we walked round the gardens and came to a fountain with seating all around I sat down next to an old gentleman my granddaughter asked me how long ago was this war I confessed I wasn't sure when the old chap said it was so many many years ago and after talking for a while he said with great emotion that he had lost 22 of his classmates in that war and that he and two others were the only survivors from his year ,my granddaughter stood there patting his hand ,she was four years old.I can still if I close my eyes see him sitting there in the sunshine smiling at my granddaughter.Mig
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 26,708
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Thank you, LV and mig, for those very poignant stories.

    I've remembered a more upbeat one. We were going to church in L.A. It was in a fairly big immigrant area and that might explain the stalls i the car park. I can only guess that nearly out of date food was being sold cheaply. As we walked (him) and limped (me) through, one man thrust a loaf of Hawaian bread into my hands. I must have looked surprised but he just smiled and refused payment. I still have no idea what it was all about but the bread was delicious.

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