OA in hip after fracture 10 years ago

markm49uk
markm49uk Member Posts: 11
edited 20. Jan 2015, 03:10 in Say Hello Archive
Hi everyone,

Just wanted to say hello and look for any help and advice with my OA. 10 years ago I fell off some step ladders and fractured my neck of femur - this was screwed together but I was warned that due to the severity of the injury I should expect issues further down the line.

Well to be honest the hip never felt right since the injury and 2011 I had an X-ray - this showed initial signs of OA. I started to notice the stiffness after walking etc but it never bothered me too much although longer walks were becoming more of an issue.

Anyway 3 months ago I started limping while walking and getting electric shock type pains down the entire leg - these appeared to ease when resting. Unfortunately the limp got worse and the pain is now fairly constant and I am finding it difficult to get comfortable including when trying to sleep.

I went for another X-ray in December and the results said the OA was now 'severe' and that a referral was needed. I have an appointment in early February with the consultant team at the hospital.

The doctor prescribed some medication to help relieve the pain but to be honest they do not appear to be having any effect so I probably need to go ask for something stronger.

I am 43 with 4 children and just finalising the adoption of the two foster children we have looked after for 20 months - life is fairly hectic so any tips/advice would be appreciated.

Mark

Comments

  • [Deleted User]
    [Deleted User] Posts: 3,636
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi from the moderation team - be assured you are not alone and all the team have some form of arthritis,I personally have similar to you in the spine (I'm waiting for hospital to),the forums are a good place to scource info/advice.
    Mod A
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,520
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hello, it's nice to meet you but I am sorry that you have had to find us. OA is often the outcome after a significant joint trauma, I have it all over the shop thanks to the joint damage caused by my other kind of arthritis and yes, the pain 'relief' doesn't offer much; the stronger the relief the more you are taken away from the pain and not vice versa. If it's only in the one hip then I suggest you use a walking stick (if you are not already) because this will ease the strain on both of your hips. As soon as one joint is damaged we naturally alter the way we move in order to reduce pain and this places other joints under undue strain - that's one way in which arthritis can 'move'. The stick should be held in the hand opposite to the hurty side.

    I can't help on the children-side of things because I don't have any but it is important to rest whenever you can and in a way that is the most comfortable for the hip. I understand about the disturbed sleep thing, I haven't had a good night in years and that tiredness adds to the mix. :( Losing weight can help matters so if you do need to shed a pound or two this might be the time to start. I was refused new knees three years ago because I was too young (at 52) and too fat, surgeons like us slimmer so we don't undo all their good work!

    I have to go, my grocery delivery is imminent. I wish you well. DD
  • markm49uk
    markm49uk Member Posts: 11
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Thanks for the welcome - it's fair to say I could do to lose a few pounds so that will be next on my agenda. Bit of a worry re options for replacement and my young age - my doctor did mention perhaps they would look at a resurfacing operation instead as this then makes the total replacement more viable in say 10 years time.

    Any thoughts on that, I am aware that due to problems with metal on metal they are more reluctant to undertake such operations although new products are now available that minimise this risk.
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,520
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I am no expert on replacements, seeing as how I haven't had any done, but if one takes care of a new joint then it can last considerably longer than the times they specify (I think one member on here has a knee which is twenty-plus years old and still functioning). I guess the fear is that younger people expect to resume their lives as they were but it isn't always advisable. Mechanical joints, no matter how wonderful, are not quite the same beasts as the originals and replacing a replacement is a more complicated op. The merits of the various 'finishes' and procedures is one for your surgeon to chat over with you so it may be time to start compiling a list of questions you may wish to ask.

    I have inadvertently lost 8 kilos in the past six months - I don't feel much difference joint-wise but, as you are fairly new to all of this, it may well be a different story and I hope it is. DD
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 27,088
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    With six children in the house you have a lot in your plate, Mark, and OA is definitely not what you want. However, it is common for it to set in at the site of a former injury and, as DD says, you might be able to prevent further damage to other joints by using some sort of walking aid.

    If it's already deemed 'severe' they might be willing to operate though I guess that will depend on the previous damage. If possible, take someone with you when you see the consultant. Two pairs of ears are better than one.

    I certainly wouldn't worry about the 'metal on metal' thing as they're aware of the problems now. I have two THRs – one's about 20 years old and no problems at all. Having said that I, like DD, have two forms of arthritis so the RA in all the other joints prevents me from doing stuff that might wear it out quicker.

    Pain relief is something of a misnomer. There are usually different / stronger ones we can try and I guess the aim is to get a balance so that we can function as well as possible without being either in agony or comatose. You might find something here of help http://www.arthritiscare.org.uk/PublicationsandResources/Selfmanagement/Healthylifestyle
  • markm49uk
    markm49uk Member Posts: 11
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Thanks again for the warm welcome and helpful replies. I am on the verge of using a walking aid - sounds silly but I feel really conscious about using a walking aid. Bit daft really given how ridiculous I probably already look with my pronounced limp!

    My wife will be attending hospital with me luckily so between us we should have it covered.

    In terms of the x-ray results - the doctor did say that 'severe' is near the top of the spectrum under which they rate OA.

    What has shocked me is the speed at which it has transformed from stiffness to sharp pain and limp - seems like overnight really.
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,520
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    You're more than welcome, information and support is what the forum's about. Believe you me, no-one will notice you using a stick because they are too wrapped up in their little worlds, take a look around while you're generally out and about and see how many people are using aids, people of all ages too.

    It may feel like a sudden jump but the damage has been steadily happening over the past ten years and this is the natural progression of the condition. Any form of arthritis is degenerative and progressive and we have to do all we can to slow those processes; one of the 'benefits' of OA is, that if it's in the right kind of joint, a new one can be implanted and the quality of life usually improves as a result as long as the patient plays their part. DD
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 27,088
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I think we all feel as if we stick out like a sore thumb when we start to use aids, especially when we don't feel old enough for them :roll: I now use a wheelchair for long walks but at first I'd only use it where I was fairly confident I wouldn't see anyone I knew as I felt a bit of a fraud. As DD says, most people won't even notice but you can always get a few one-liners ready to laugh it off with those who do.
  • markm49uk
    markm49uk Member Posts: 11
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Thanks - this site is full of useful info which will help keep me positive. Looks like I will have to give a stick a try - walked to school today to collect the children and the pain is fairly intense right now.
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 27,088
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    If you do go for a stick it's important to use it properly. It should be hip height so that the arm holding it is slightly bent at the elbow. Remember to hold it in the hand opposite the affected leg and place the stick on the ground at the same time as the affected leg.
  • markm49uk
    markm49uk Member Posts: 11
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Thanks sticky wicket. Any recommended websites for buying sticks from?
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,520
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    It's probably best to go to your local disability store or chemist for your first one, there you can try before you buy and get some good advice too. Sticks come in a wide range of shapes and sizes, some can be adjusted, others cannot, the handles and grips vary so it's best to see some in real life. DD

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