Decision time next month

purplejoanne
purplejoanne Member Posts: 24
edited 2. Sep 2016, 04:28 in Living with Arthritis archive
Hi Everyone,

I am due to see my consultant next month to discuss having my left hip replaced due to OA. I am 47 years old and have been suffering for the last 3 years. I saw him 6 months ago and was told I'm too young to have it done, due to the new hip only last 15/20 years. But I have had to put my life on hold, i had to give up work as my job entailed me being constantly on my feet and lifting heavy bags around. I can't walk far and therefore means i can't do as much if we go away or even around the house. I don't see why i should be putting my life on hold like this. I need to work and do more.

The reason for my writing is to ask for advice, do I push to have the operation when i go next month or do I just try and get on with it for longer.

What are other peoples experiences of this and would you recommend me to have the operation done so that i can move on with my life. I know its not a total fix and i also know i will have to have my other hip done eventually but i am getting so frustrated with all the waiting around.

Thank you for letting me waffle on.

XX

Comments

  • moderator
    moderator Moderator Posts: 4,088
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi,I know there are many on here that have had a replacement,as to 'lifespan I'm not 100% but it is a very successful op and I'm sure you will get the answers you want
    Al
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 26,325
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    “I have had to put my life on hold”. “I don't see why i should be putting my life on hold like this” “so that i can move on with my life” “i also know i will have to have my other hip done eventually”.

    It's a tough one. You are clearly anxious to get back to what, for you, is 'normal life'. Yet you know that will be limited even if you do because your other hip is also on the blink.

    The reason why the surgeons want to make people wait is partly because the NHS is very short on funding and partly because they know that, if they do new hips on someone in their 40s or 50s then the likelihood is they'll need a revision down the line. Revisions are more costly, require more skills, are more likely to go wrong and carry an ongoing risk of infection.

    I have two THRs and two TKRs one of which is a revision. (I have R.A.) I never had to think about whether or not I needed any of them. With the first two TKRs and one hip I could barely walk at all, the other hip broke and, with the revision, my TKR had slid way out of place. So, really, I had it easy as regards decision making which is maybe why I've never regretted any of my ops.

    I honestly don't know what I'd do in your situation. I've never had to ask for a replacement joint. Do you have a choice or will it be the surgeon's choice? If the surgeon refuses van you go privately? A very tricky situation.
    If at first you don't succeed, then skydiving definitely isn't for you.
    Steven Wright
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,557
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Quality of life is the important thing: ongoing pain is debilitating and reduces said quality. If you are offered a replacement I would go for it because the sooner it is done the less strain is being placed on the other hip (and other joints) and the quality of life will improve. If you take care of the joint there is no reason why it shouldn't last longer than their specified time. Four years ago I was refused new knees aged 53 (for being too young!) but others younger have had replacements; maybe thinking is changing or it depends on the surgeon involved. DD
    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben
  • moderator
    moderator Moderator Posts: 4,088
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi purplejoanne
    sorry to hear that your hip is giving you so much pain presently. I think rather than seeing the solutions as either having a replacement or not it might be worth looking at improving your present function and pain management as a first option. Sometimes it is very hard to see a bigger picture when you are in so much pain, I think we all feel like that sometimes.

    If your consultant is not willing to operate maybe he/she could refer you for physio and hydrotherapy it would be worth asking them for this. Also taking up some regular exercise will help to strengthen your joints for when you do have the surgery so that it will be more successful. Swimming is helpful and I am sure others can suggest exercise options. One form of exercise that has been talked about in out Inspire magazine is Alexander technique, http://portfolio.cpl.co.uk/inspire/2016-autumn/body-mechanics/

    It will also be important that the Drs sort out your pain levels as much as possible so that you are able to do more. Have a look at our booklet on pain management here https://www.arthritiscare.org.uk/what-is-arthritis/resources/217-managing-pain Making sure you take care of yourself is very important but often difficult to do.
    Lastly a hip replacement is major surgery and often is very successful and as DD has pointed out quality of life is very important too.
    I hope this helps
    Best Wishes
    Sharon
  • barbara12
    barbara12 Member Posts: 21,129
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I agree with SW that a revision is more complicated, but saying that my friends hips are 24 years old this year..so much better than they thought..I have had both done but in my 60s so much older than you..it will have to be your decision so I would have a long chat about it with your surgeon ..pain is pain I say ..you will know when the time is right..good luck
    Love
    Barbara
  • purplejoanne
    purplejoanne Member Posts: 24
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Thank you everyone for your replies, its much appreciated.


    I have been to physiotherapy today for issues with my neck and was told by the physio that according to my notes i have been given the funding for hip replacements so its just down to the consultant to say when he will do the operation. I think so that i can get on with my life and get back to work i will be asking him to go forward with the operation, providing he doesn't use the excuse of age/weight.

    Thank you for the info about pain and inspire magazine.

    Im need to get into the habit of doing more exercise to help me now and after the operation, not sure about anyone else but i do find it very difficult to be motivated to do this

    thanks again

    x
  • barbara12
    barbara12 Member Posts: 21,129
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi again
    Its is very hard to get motivated, the best exercise you can do at the moment is to push your bum into the chair and tighten your muscles its really will help..if you need to know anything at all about THR please ask away..I had lots of help off people on this forum..
    Love
    Barbara
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 26,325
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    That sounds promising. You might like to read up on hip replacement surgery here
    http://tinyurl.com/ptzke9u

    You can also download AC's Exercise and Arthritis booklet here https://www.arthritiscare.org.uk/what-is-arthritis/resources/218-exercise-and-arthritis . If you start now you give your replacement hip(s) the best chance of success.
    If at first you don't succeed, then skydiving definitely isn't for you.
    Steven Wright