Hi - hip replacement under 40?

ChrisS
ChrisS Member Posts: 3
edited 9. May 2018, 06:32 in Say Hello Archive
Hi!

I am in my late 30s, and until very recently have been a very keen runner and triathlete. I have osteoarthritis (worse in my right hip) and I've been told that I can no longer run, and that I need to look seriously at having a replacement. I am really hoping to get advice from (once/still) active people of a similar age.

I had a debridement a few years ago which offered some relief but that surgery no longer an option. I now walk with a bit of a limp and can't even consider running.

I can however still ride my bike (long distances) and my big fear is that if I go for surgery now I'll lose the one quality exercise I still enjoy.

Would really welcome any wisdom/experiences people can share.

In summary - if I go for surgery will I still be able to do vigorous exercise (esp. road cycling)? Do I just soldier on with what I've got?

Thanks for reading!

Comments

  • moderator
    moderator Moderator Posts: 4,080
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi ChrisS and welcome to the Arthritis forums.

    By coincidence, there is a “front page” feature on the Arthritis Care web site on Exercise and Arthritis - https://www.arthritiscare.org.uk/living-with-arthritis/exercise-and-arthritis

    It’s quite a general set of articles, so hopefully you will get some replies from those with Arthritis who specifically are cyclists, or take part in other vigorous exercise.

    All best wishes
    Brynmor.
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 26,240
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi Chris.

    I can see that exercise is very important to you and that's good because it's essential for managing arthritis. As you've discovered, though, it does have to be the right kind of exercise not some that will put additional strain on the joints.

    I can't think of any reason why you shouldn't cycle post-THR as long as you first concentrate on recovery. I think it's 3 months before cycling should re-enter the equation. Just how much you do after that would probably depend on building up slowly. Remember what happens with a THR. There's a lot of cutting and sawing and, just because the outer scar is looking good, that doesn't mean to say all the inner healing is complete. But, with patience born of determination to get there. I'd think all would be well though the surgeon is the best one to ask.

    There is just one other thing which I'm not sure you've considered. That is, you'd be unlikely to get a THR on the NHS at this stage. We have people who are bone on bone here but still waiting because they are 'too young'. They are usually in their 40s or 50s. The reason being that joint replacements don't last forever and to replace a replaced joint is a much bigger, more expensive operation.

    This is what Arthritis Research UK says about exercise after a THR https://tinyurl.com/ydbgv4ss
    "The deeper sorrow carves into your being the more joy you can contain." Kahlil Gibran
  • ChrisS
    ChrisS Member Posts: 3
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi, thanks so much for your insight.

    There is just one other thing which I'm not sure you've considered. That is, you'd be unlikely to get a THR on the NHS at this stage.

    No - I hadn't considered this at all! I was thinking about whether or not I could manage things for another 1-3 years, not decades!

    Thanks also for the link, trying to read as much as possible at the moment,
    Best,
    Chris
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,558
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    The only person I know who was given a new joint (in her case a knee) under the age of thirty was my cousin's wife: she was eighteen and the culprit was bone cancer. She is now in her mid-fifties, and because she has not taken care of that and the subsequent revisions, she is now facing life without a knee as the current replacement has gone for a burton and she has run out of original bone to fit another joint.

    I think it very unlikely you will be given this on the NHS, people in their 40s, 50s, 60s and 70s are on waiting lists and, no matter how bad we as patients may feel things are, surgeons will wait until a certain level of damage has been reached: this can take years. I am not sure whether a private surgeon would consider you - they more than likely would abroad but that carries too many extra risks for my liking.

    A replacement joint is not as good as the original, it will need care to ensure it lasts. Surgeons cite around ten years before the replacement needs replacing but, with care, one can get twenty or thirty years out of it. DD
    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 26,240
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Maybe your GP could fix you up with an orthopaedic appointment and you could have a chat with the surgeon about urgency, waiting lists in your area etc. Good luck :D
    "The deeper sorrow carves into your being the more joy you can contain." Kahlil Gibran