16 and living with arthritis

gia
gia Member Posts: 9
edited 20. May 2011, 03:36 in My child has arthritis
Hey my name is gia and i am 16. I broke my ankle last year and i was in hospital for 3 weeks ever since i have been in an out of hospital for physio, check ups and i have had 4 operations. This week i got told i had arthritis and all my cartilage had gone between the 2 bones that make my ankle joint. The doctor gave me 2 options, 1. they could fuse my ankle together or 2. get a joint replacement. but they then told me i am too young for either. I am in a lot of pain and cannot walk. is there any other options????? and what rate DLA can i get??

please help

Comments

  • GUINDI
    GUINDI Member Posts: 28
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi Gia..hope you are not in so much pain today. Like you I am new to all this and my problems are the knees and I am much older than you but I am sure someone here can give you good advise and support like they are giving me. chin up and sure things will be okay. love and hugs Paloma xx
  • GUINDI
    GUINDI Member Posts: 28
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Gia, make sure you post your chats in the LIVING WITH ARTHRITIS FORUM and you will get more people viewing it and getting in touch luv

    Paloma xxx
  • gia
    gia Member Posts: 9
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Thanks for the message. I am not in to much pain today as my doctor has given me pain killers to take everyday so i can manage the pain and so it doesn't get on top of me. Its good to know there are other people out there who are going through the same as i am who i can talk to.

    thank you :)
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,520
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Oh poor you, I am so sorry to read this. I am an ancient old crone of 52 but pain is pain no matter how old or young you are. There is nothing wrong with trying to get ahead of the pain: that means taking a steady dose of the dullers so that they kinda build up in the body: they do not take all the pain away but they do take off the edge, thus making life a little more bearable, but having said that it sounds as tho what your doc has given you is helping sufficiently. I have just learned that I have OA in my knees (I thought the knee trouble was the other sort of arthritis I have, this crept in under my radar!) and I am taking more dullers than I used, simply because the pain is different, sharper, hotter, it's hard to describe. The dullers help and that is the main thing. I wish you well. DD
  • gia
    gia Member Posts: 9
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    i get where your coming from even though they take away most of the pain i find there is still a sort of ache in my foot, not sure if yours is the same??
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,520
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I would be very happy if it was just an ache! :smile: I am a lot further down the line than you, my constantly affected joints are the sacro-iliacs, the knees, the ankles and all toes. Everything hurts, all the time, walking is an exquisite experience as is sitting and lying. The pain is sharp, hot, it twangs and zings: the OA has caused a different kind of damage to the PA, on the outer part of both knees I have bone on bone and extra growth (like hooks), the PA (which is an inflammatory version of arthritis) has damaged the joint linings. I am in my fifteenth year of this dross - but pain is pain, yes? Over the years I have learned to adjust and to cope, but it does grind away at one, no doubt about that. I hope that the pain dullers do make a difference, if yours is OA have you thought about trying some supplements? The jury is out on whether they help or not but as you are young, and your bones are still growing, it may be worth a thought. I often think that those who swear by them are those who don't actually have arthritis but they like to think they do. Take care, keep in touch and let us know how you are getting on. I look in on here quite often and like updates! :smile:
  • gia
    gia Member Posts: 9
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    yeh i have osteoarthritis. (i think thats how you spell it) i take multivitamins and cod liver oil but my doctor said theres nothin really i can take but the pain killers. I am looking into any operations that i can have to make it easier for me and i have found this

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI)
    Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) is another new technique where the surgeon takes a small sample of cartilage cells from the edge of your knee.

    The cells are sent to a laboratory and placed in an incubator, where they are given nutrients in order to encourage them to divide and produce new cells. After a few weeks, the number of cartilage cells will have increased by 50 times from their original number.

    The new cartilage will be used to replace the damaged cartilage.

    The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) has studied ACI and decided that there is not enough evidence about its long-term effects or safety. Therefore, ACI is not available on the NHS unless it is being used as part of a clinical trial. However, a number of private clinics may offer ACI.

    As there is uncertainty about the possible long-term risks of ACI, you should fully discuss the possible risks and benefits with your surgeon before choosing to have the procedure

    have you heard of this before???
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,520
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    No, I haven't folowed OA research at all as I didn't know I had it until April this year! Don't get your hopes up too high, it sounds fab but I don't know about its history: joann1 has recently had something like this done I think, you could do a search on her under the members heading and find her posts to read. It takes years and years for something to move from reasearch theory into clinical practice, and rightly so.

    We live in an age where we demand that everything can be fixed. Disease is natural, it is a part of life, and sometimes it cannot be mended. One would think that OA would not exist, seeing as how bones are in a constant process fo renewal, but it does. There are 10 million in this country who have some form of arthritis. It isn't a problem that can be fixed, mainly because no-one knows, as yet, why we get it - that's my take on it, anyway. DD

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