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Hip replacement

Morning,
I’ve had both hips replaced last March/May and things are better - happy days :smile: but I’m an active 33 year old - swapped more impact exercise for less but my work is on my feet 8-9 hours a day and according to my watch I do on average 10,000 steps per day.

I know a hip replacement can last between 10 to 20 years but in the back of my mind is wearing the replacement down. Does anyone know what it feels like to reach that point? Is it painful? I can’t get an image of my torso being on the floor and my legs to the side of me like an scene from beetle juice.

I know I’m making light of it but it does worry me.

Anyone got any experience?
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Comments

  • frogmortonfrogmorton Posts: 25,775 ✭✭✭

    Ah I get it! Totally!

    Not on my own behalf but that of my youngest who had hip surgery and 18 and a new shoulder joint at 19. No choice the damage was too great and a result of chemotherapy and dexamethasone for cancer.

    I am worried to death about her future. As far as i know (but i will check) she is making hay while the sun shines and getting on with her life.

    There are people on here who have had 'revisions' I am sure one of them will be along soon to tell you their story, but from what I've read they start having hip pain and groin pain again. They don't suddenly drop you on the floor in agony.

    Take care

    Love

    Toni xxx
  • I am currently being denied a hip and knee replacement because of BMI restrictions imposed by my local health authority. I am in severe pain and am unable to walk, I am trying to find a health authority that does not have bmi restrictions so that I can get my GP to refer me to a consultant that will treat me. I'm having alot of problems finding this information, does anyone have a list of hospitals that offer surgery without BMI restrictions. Thanks.

    E.

  • AlAl Posts: 165 mod

    Hi and welcome,

    It's great to meet you, you have come to the right place for information and conversation with others like you living one or more forms of arthritis

    There are many here more than happy to share their experience as you share yours.

    This link is for general information regarding any type of arthritis

    About arthritis

    https://www.versusarthritis.org/about-arthritis

    Find out more about the different conditions, treatments and how to manage your symptoms.


    if you have a specific question please post in the Living with Arthritis discussion or for general chat in the Chit Chat discussion. Just join in wherever you feel comfortable

    Al

  • stickywicketstickywicket Posts: 25,973 ✭✭

    Hi danm,

    I don’t THINK that ‘normal usage’ will wear out hip replacements quickly (though marathon running probably would!)

    I have two THRs plus two knee replacements. Well, three in all. One of the replacements was replaced about ten years ago. Yes, I’m a glutton for punishment but I started with RA at 15 back in 1961 and OA followed once the synovial fluid was gone. My first knee replacements were done in 1981. One was revised about ten years ago. My hips followed about 20 and 15 years ago.

    I must emphasise that I’m by no means typical. On the one hand having a full house means there’s a bit more strain on them because it’s hard for the surgeon to get my legs completely level. On the other hand I’ve really looked after my replaced joints with a decent diet, weight and exercises.

    Nowadays, mine are nothing like level. I still have the TKR from 1981 but it’s wandered off out of place. The THR above it has also managed to travel upwards. My surgeon won’t operate on either unless it’ becomes an emergency because it’s too risky.

    I think, at 33, you’re bound to need them revising at some point – if not at two points! My advice would be to just be sensible and enjoy them. When they start to fail it’s just very similar to when the original ones did. My tactic is always to do my exercises more and, preferably, to get physio advice. Some physios look at me aghast and are afraid of breaking me but the good ones really help. They might offer only gentle stuff but it really helps. I

    I wish you many happy years with your current ones. Treat them kindly and have fun together.


    Ellandrhia, I’m afraid BMI is not the main problem right now. I don’t think many, if any orthopaedic departments are doing elective surgery and waiting lists are getting longer. Indeed, I believe some are just closed because they’re so long.

    I would strongly recommend the exercises that Versus Arthritis show. Strong muscles lead to less pain.

    The reason why many hospitals use BMI as a guide is because it’s a fact that the outcome for joint replacements is much better in patients who are not overweight. So, while you’re waiting, why not see what you can do to enhance your probability of success?

    I’ve no idea what the situation is in private hospitals. Perhaps they are working.

    “There is always a well-known solution to every human problem - neat, plausible, and wrong.” H.L. Mencken
  • Mike1Mike1 Posts: 852 ✭✭✭✭

    My baby sister has stage 4 OA in her right knee and was told to lose weight prior to surgery, she duly lost 2 stone and then she was told that they would not operate until she is 67 so she has 9 more years of agony to wait. A high BMI is not just about the pressure on the joints due to extra weight but also can affect anaesthetic and a significantly higher risk of postoperative complications, such as heart attack, wound infection, nerve injury and other problems.

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