New Hip Day

My new hip is finally about to happen(!) so someone suggested it might be helpful to others for me to keep a bit of a blog going. It's good to know that despite the 4.7m on waiting lists (don't get me started...) that things are showing signs of moving again. We can only hope they start making serious in roads to helping those who have had to be sidelined during the pandemic, it's been such a tough time in that respect, amongst so many other difficulties right across society.

After a year of waiting, I heard 3 weeks ago that a date had been set (tomorrow) for my surgery, which didn't give me much time to clear my desk and put everything in order. It couldn't come soon enough - my hip is now so bad that I can barely manage a short trip round the shops, the physical aspects of my work are now near impossible, and I'm in constant pain in at night - there are no positions that are comfortable any more. Even getting round the house now requires a stick, although I keep forgetting it so limp around somewhat melo-dramatically. Walks outside or any exercise indoors is far beyond me.

I'm going to the Wrightington in Wigan, so had my preop, MRSA swab and covid test there over the last few weeks, the covid test came back negative today so we're off!

I've been going through the MRSA decolonization - daily showers and hair washes with a product the hospital provided, along with sticking cleansing goo up my nose for 5 days, and clean towels and sleeping in clean sheets every day. The clean sheets have been nice. The constant changing beds and laundry not so.

I'm due at the hospital at 0700 tomorrow, which means a 04.30 rise, which will be near miraculous for me. I'm rarely awake by 0800. I don't suppose there will be much sleeping involved tonight. By the time I get there it wouldn't surprise me if they have to wake me up for the pre-med, it won't be the first time that's happened!

The OT rang earlier this week and I have bits of useful equipment delivered, incuding sock slider, grabber, trolley, raised loo seat and crutches. No breakfast, drugs, deodorant, body or face lotions, no make up or hair products (including conditioner) allowed tomorrow, and no leg shaving for 3 weeks 😳. I will rock up, wincing with pain, bleary eyed and looking horrendous, I almost feel sorry for my surgeon 😅

I'm trying not to think about what's ahead tomorrow, even though a friend "kindly" filled me in on all the gruesome details of her surgery in advance. I would rather not have known to be honest. I have a good surgeon at a great hospital, so I'm just going to throw myself at their mercy and let them get on with it. Me fretting won't make a jot of difference, even if it's hard not to. But I'm packing extra chocolate just in case to cheer myself up 😏

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Comments

  • Jewels
    Jewels Member Posts: 135

    Good luck hun and you'll be fine at least you won't have to limp anymore lol my left hip is also starting now as well the joys of Arthur ay it's normal to be nervous with any op and at least your legs will be warm 🤣 see you on the other side xxx

  • KazandNoo
    KazandNoo Member Posts: 111

    Fantastic news about your op Lilymary! 😊 Keep us posted.

  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 26,248

    Lilymary, my husband got his THR yesterday. Like you, a 7am start following an hour and a quarter's drive, but he rang me at 11am to say he was done and dusted. Admittedly very sore yesterday apparently due to a lot of bone growth having to be removed. Much better today and coming home tomorrow. I wish you likewise.

    "The deeper sorrow carves into your being the more joy you can contain." Kahlil Gibran
  • Jona
    Jona Member Posts: 298

    Hi Lilymary,

    Just to wish you good luck and a speedy recovery, we should call you Jackie O she used to have her sheets changed every day but she did have servants for that 😉 anyhoo eat chocolate and take care of you

    love Jona 💐💪

  • Lilymary
    Lilymary Member Posts: 1,303
    edited 17. Apr 2021, 16:58

    Thank you all for your kind good wishes. I’ve been done now, had a spinal block and sedative, asked the anaesthetist to just throw drugs at me as I didn’t want to know what was going on, started coming to as they wheeled me into recovery, with my legs feeling like they were floating above the bed. Very weird, but blissfully unaware of the gruesome bit. The anaesthesia process was a bit scary (don’t like feeling out of control, hence never took up skiing! 😅) but pretty much painless,

    A bit uncomfortable now, but not surprising really. But I’ve found Big Bang Theory’ on the telly so I’m happy. Have been able to drink lots of tea and water and eat a meal and had a wee (TMI?) so nurses happy with me now that bladder’s working again. Legs now back in the right place too (!) and can wiggle them about. They’re not getting me out of bed till tomorrow.when the physio comes. Meanwhile I’ve got an inflatable gaiter on each calf pumping alternately to keep the blood moving.

    saw the surgeon who said the hip socket was a mess and very soft, but will harden off now it’s relined. Had a ceramic head into plastic socket, should last 15+ years and get me back out in the hills. (is this one of the squeaky ones? Hope not...) He also said OA can deteriorate very suddenly, I had no idea I even had arthritis until the pain went off the chart and X-rays showed I already needed a new hip, but I’m grateful I didn’t have years of pain leading up to it like so many. LM xx

  • Jewels
    Jewels Member Posts: 135

    Aww so glad your doing great bet you can't wait to be able to walk properly again 😁 have a nice rest while you're in there really pleased for you xx

  • Jona
    Jona Member Posts: 298

    Hi Lilymary,

    Good to hear all is well now to recovery god speed but no hills yet 😊

    love Jona xx

  • frogmorton
    frogmorton Member Posts: 26,672

    Well isn't this fabulous!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    I am over the moon for you @Lilymary finally it is DONE🙂

    (@stickywicket good luck with the patient I am very pleased he is all done too)

    Please do tell us how it all goes it gives potential hippies an idea of what is ahead for them doesn't it?

    Well done eating, drinking and weeing (essential else you never escape hospitals!) now you do know what else has to happen don't you? Eat plenty of fruit😉

    I know you will be having the very best of care at Wrightington that is where my daughter had her shoulder done they are LOVELY!

    Take care now

    Love

    Toni xxx
  • Lilymary
    Lilymary Member Posts: 1,303

    Well, after an odd night, I managed about six hours sleep on and off. The physios have given me a bit of crutches training and have put me in the chair. It’s fair to say I would have been much happier left in bed, but at least they’ve taken of the inflating gaiters that kept the blood pumping round. The pump was pretty loud but ear plugs helped.

    My hip feels like a football at the end of a cup final match, and the rest of the leg has come out in sympathy, but this is probably going to be the worst bit.

  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 26,248

    Well done! You're getting there. And, please, as frogmorton says, no apologies over the 'wee' info. Peeing is all-important after an anaesthetic. Mr SW was a late beginner but got there before any alarms. I think the gaitors depend on the hospital. I had them: he didn't.

    Now begins the hard work but I'm sure you'll put in the necessary graft. I can't believe how good he is considering his op was only last Thursday. He even got his own breakfast this morning. Yay!

    "The deeper sorrow carves into your being the more joy you can contain." Kahlil Gibran
  • Lilymary
    Lilymary Member Posts: 1,303

    Well, I won’t lie, I feel really rubbish today. The physio got me out of bed (ouch!) and onto crutches (big ouch!) did a few steps and back and they left me on the chair. Really uncomfortable (what isn’t right now?) But eventually decided to try going to the loo, big mistake, sat down, blood pressure plummeted and I nearly passed out. Broke all the physio’s rules to get back to the bed, we’re i continued almost passing out till the nurses pit me on oxygen. Anyway, crisis averted, decided chair practice is for tomorrow. Nurse brought me a commode to try a bit later, sat on the edge of the bed and promptly burst into tears. What a fun journey this is! The only blessing is the physios aren’t back till tomorrow. My “veteran of two new knees” sister assures me I”ll come to really dislike my physio. But needs must. Doing lots of foot waggling in bed meanwhile.

    Highlight of the day, I can see into a little courtyard from my bed and two partridges dropped in for a visit. I haven’t seen any for years and years, and now I’ve seen two pairs in totally different locations in 3 weeks.🙂

  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 26,248

    Don't be disheartened with a little set back. They happen. Tomorrow will be better.

    After my first walk, post knee revision op, I managed to collapse completely on the commode (Sparks out. Dignity? Whassat! ) and was given oxygen and taken to HDU for the night. Anesthesia and peeing both lower B. P. I bet tomorrow will be good for you.

    "The deeper sorrow carves into your being the more joy you can contain." Kahlil Gibran
  • Lilymary
    Lilymary Member Posts: 1,303
    edited 19. Apr 2021, 13:19

    Oh no @stickywicket , that’s not great. Didn't Elvis suffer the same ignominy at the end of his life? At least we didn’t take it as far as he did.

    Day 3, had a decent night’s sleep, woke up in exactly the same position I laid down in 6 hours earlier, so pain just about everywhere woke me up. Wriggling around a bit helped but then I caved in and asked for pain relief. These are also making me feel a bit sick, but have miraculously cured 12 months of battling constipation. This has lead to me needing to perfect toilet transfers, a key life skill at present. Also got to sit at the sink and have a wash, and attempted putting on underwear (another key life skill, in my opinion).

    I was woken by my overly cheerful surgeon this morning (I don’t do mornings, as a rule), who said it was unusual for people to have this much pain at this stage, but noticed I was very bruised and put it down to that. (I bruise if I brush against a leaf.) the wound has also oozed a bit, but otherwise he seemed happy.

    I’ve forced myself to sit by the bed much of the day, reinforced by more pain relief, and I managed a little walk along the corridor. Had a chat with the patient in the next room, of similar age, who had also had THR on Saturday. Her arthritis had appeared very suddenly, as did mine. It was interesting to compare notes, and we both feel we have a long way to go to build up our confidence again.

    The prospect of going home with new body parts without a team of nurses with their armoury of pain killers, support, encouragement, helping hands and advice is daunting. I texted my OH a photo of my leg so he can be prepared for it. I’m not sure he appreciated it.

    Question: I’ve noticed my new hip clicks. Has anyone else found this?

  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 26,248

    I felt exactly the same when I left the maternity hospital with my firstborn! We all survived.

    I haven't had the clicking with a THR but did with my knee revision. I was so desperate to get home for Christmas that I forgot all I'd been told about getting into cars, stood with all my weight on my operated leg and twisted to get the other one in . When it all started clicking I was scared but the surgeon said it was just ligaments (I think) re-arranging themselves and nothing to worry about. It's all been great for years now.

    "The deeper sorrow carves into your being the more joy you can contain." Kahlil Gibran
  • Lilymary
    Lilymary Member Posts: 1,303

    Thanks @stickywicket , that’s good to know.

  • Ellen
    Ellen Moderator Posts: 592
    edited 20. Apr 2021, 06:21

    Thank you @Lilymary (and @stickywicket ) this thread will really help people facing the prospect of a THR.

    I hope you had a good night.

    Best wishes

    Ellen.

  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 26,248

    How stupid can I get? (Please don't attempt an aswer.) You are in hospital with your consultant to hand. Do ask him about the clicking. It was fine for me but he's the one who knows about you. I'm cónfident it will be nothing to fret about but reassurance from those who actually know is always good.

    I, too, hope you slept well and the BP is behaving. Mr SW's BP went so low that I asked our son in California (8 hours behind us) to keep an eye on him that first night. It's still pretty low. He's back on his BP meds but with orders to stop them if it falls too low. We are strange creatures.

    "The deeper sorrow carves into your being the more joy you can contain." Kahlil Gibran
  • Lilymary
    Lilymary Member Posts: 1,303
    edited 21. Apr 2021, 09:05

    Thanks @stickywicket , the nurses said the fainting fits immediately post surgery are so common they actually wait for it to happen, usually the first time patients get up. Sometimes they find people passed out in the chair by their bed! They also said spontaneous weeping or sobbing is common the following day, an effect of the anaesthetic. While I’m not normally a weeper, in my case I’d also admit to it being down in no small part to a good dose of self pity, pain and suddenly realising what I’d just had done to my body.

    I did get the chance to ask the doc Re the clicking, he was a bit surprised but said it will settle down. I hope he’s right.How is Mr SW, other than BP issues? Hope he’s doing ok.

    i’m home now, with a humongous bag of drugs (like an illicit party bag from a rave!). It was probably the most uncomfortable car journey I’ve ever had. Top tip for others, invest in a lot of soft pillows to sit on, and make sure there’s one in the car!

    Had terrible restless legs at night which kept me writhing (carefully) in bed for hours, but oddly the thing that seems to work was propping my head and shoulders up on a lot of pillows, which I had discovered on night 3 in hospital. No idea why it worked, but it does.

    Woke at 3 am with a pain flare up so reached for the oramorph. And managed to pour most of it onto my legs, whence it dribbled down onto the carpet. It’s surprisingly sticky, as it turns out. A little tricky to clean off too, under current circumstances. Swayed into the bathroom on my crutches (no, I don’t recommend swaying on crutches either) and wiped most of it off and decided not to care about the rest.

    Eventually I woke again at 6.30 (hospital reveille) after a restless night wanting to roll over all the time. I put my crutches on the bed alongside me, partly for ready access but also to stop me rolling over in my sleep, which worked quite well. But I now realise how good hospital mattresses are at stopping bed sores, the rest of my backside is now very fed up!

    I have to say I feel worse than I thought I would, and my gut has no idea what’s hit it after a year battling codiene-induced constipation, which is helping me perfect going up stairs on crutches fairly smartish, but I know it will all settle. This bit’s just hard going.

  • Lilymary
    Lilymary Member Posts: 1,303

    Toby keeping an eye on the patient

  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 26,248

    There are a lot of things one must 'decide not to care about' post-op and I'm sure painting ones legs with oramorph is right up there. (Though I'd suspect it works better taken orally😉)

    I think the restless legs can be a temporary result of a spinal. At least you've worked out how tó improve it a little.

    Sore backside? How about regular liberal applications of an aqueous cream? (Oramorph is not an aqueous cream!) Don't hurt yourself with a DIY job. If you and Mr LM have been together a long time it probably won't be anything like as much fun for him as in days gone by but, hey, you're worth it.

    Mine uses a pillow between his legs to stop rolling over. So did I. His surgeon recommended two but, despite a king size bed, I'm not sure how he'd manage that.

    He is gradually working his way through a large box of Laxido which I remember from his last op. I always think it sounds like a TexMex version of a laxative.

    He's doing very well, thanks but we live in a bungalow so he doesn't have tó dó a flight of stairs for every loo visit. He's very cónscientious about all other exercises but, having seen him in the garden on one stick, I think it's about time I re-introduced the washing up exercise. Very therapeutic. (For me, at least.)

    Keep plugging away. Slowly, gently, carefully and regularly achieves far more, long term, than going at things hell for leather. Keep making mental notes of the 'firsts'. There will be móre than you think. And good luck with it all 👍️

    "The deeper sorrow carves into your being the more joy you can contain." Kahlil Gibran
  • Lilymary
    Lilymary Member Posts: 1,303

    Thanks @stickywicket , great advice and plenty of giggles, as ever xx

  • frogmorton
    frogmorton Member Posts: 26,672

    Oh gosh Lilymary that sounds as though you are dealing with things with your usual level of adversity and humour!!

    Well done you for doing so well and sharing your experience and tips with us all here. It will really help others.

    Very often people faint due to low BP ( spell check wanted to put BO there but never mind!) Causes by lying down and can really be helped by drinking plenty. With the knock on effect of needing the loo more unfortunately.

    I am so impressed with your progress though. You are doing great. Probably, in the opinion of the pusskin, largely due to his ministrations!

    Take care

    And Mrs Wicket I hope you are doing well and coping with Mr ok.

    Love

    Toni xxx
  • Lilymary
    Lilymary Member Posts: 1,303

    Day 6: another 0650 rise, about 6.5 hours moderately disturbed sleep, + a similar 2 hour self in the afternoon, The “jumpy legs” have abated, but their nastier younger brother, Screeching Pain from Trapped Nerve has moved in. Obvs sleeping on my back with legs out straight, but if I move it 5mm in the wrong direction it’s like someone has shot me in the groin, and the wave of pain floods down my leg, waking me up shouting in pain. This had me reaching for the oramorph twice in the night, although I only poured it onto the quilt this time. PLEASE let this one pass ....

    Pressure points are now becoming a problem from only sleeping in one position, and these are seriously interrupting sleep. My rump was uncomfortable even before I laid down just from sitting in a chair for so long. i’ve found a few more soft pillows and cushions and now sleep on a long line of them under my spine and rump, which have helped a lot, but the back of my heels need help now too.

    Still have a dodgy tum (surely there can’t be much left?!) so this probably accounts for some of the lethargy. I’m retaliating with a fusillade of live yoghurt and acidophilus, backed up with the big guns - loperamide and dry toast, and I’m drinking so much water my kidneys have submitted an official claim for overtime. Oh this is such fun 🙄 (Sorry, hospital humour...)

    My bruised hip and thigh are still very painful so we sacrificed a bag of frozen peas to the cause yesterday to use as a cold compress, and I suspect that may have helped a little. I’ll try this again.

    I managed to potter around the house a bit yesterday with the aid of the trolley and a hippy-style canvas bag across my chest for carting things around, but I need to try actually walking. The front garden is the first obstacle, 14 steps and a long slope down to the road. Using my hip in the way that Nature intended may help start rebuilding it. I’ll just go a few yards along the road and back, but it’s a start.

    The click in my new hip concerns me a bit though, apparently this can be a feature of ceramic hips, I’m hoping this isn’t permanent. It’s not painful, but it’s rather a yucky feeling...

    Before my op I spent a lot of time reassuring clients that I wouldn’t be out of action re work for more than a few days, and one started emailing me the day I left hospital. I was wrong. I simply haven’t felt up to even replying, let alone being proactive, and I think she’s twigged as the emails have stopped. A goal today will be to try out my chair, fire up the computer and gingerly open my emails. We raised the monitor before the op so I don’t hunch forward so much, lifted the bank of sockets so I can reach them more easily, and another pillow will be pressed into service for my rump.

    I’m also getting the hang of new drugs, paracetamol, blood thinners (so can't take anti-inflammatories) omeprazole and emergency back up oramorph. On full dosage at present, but so far I can’t say I’ve seen any of the miraculous instant relief from pain that other new hippies report. I live in hope.

  • Jewels
    Jewels Member Posts: 135

    So your fighting the fight hun tbh its scary just thinking about having to go through it whenever that will be for me but you sound like you are trying to get on with it hun and it will all be worth it in the end 😁💐

  • Lilymary
    Lilymary Member Posts: 1,303
    edited 22. Apr 2021, 12:39

    just completed my first moonwalk, my Fitbit says 850 steps, took about half an hour. sitting down and lying down are more painful than standing at the mo, so a walk is a bit of a relief! 😂 on the other hand, my husband has just come back from running 7 miles in 1.5 hours 🙄