Wrist fusion

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Hi there about 13 weeks ago I had wrist fusion in my right hand .the pain has gone but the mobility and dexterity is greatly impaired. I also need a partial wrist fusion in my left hand now because of the pain. I just wanted to know if people on here with double wrist fusion. How there daily life is .plus any benefits they can get thanks Andrew.

Comments

  • noddingtonpete
    noddingtonpete Moderator Posts: 1,109
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    Hello @Andrew47nurdin and welcome to the community. We are a friendly and supportive group and I hope that you will find that as well.

    I understand that you have had one wrist fusion and are now looking to have the second one done and wondering how it affects people.

    Have a look at the following

    You may also find our website article of use as well

    If you search wrist fusion by using the little magnifying glass top right on the community you can see quite a few discussions on the topic.

    Please do keep posting and let us know how you are getting on and I am sure that others will connect with you to share their support and experiences as well.

    With very best wishes

    Peter (moderator)

    Need more help? - call our Helpline on0800 5200 520Monday to Friday 9am to 6pm

  • airwave
    airwave Member Posts: 579
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    A precautionary tale, not meant to scare just make you stop and think. I have had three ops on my feet, the first a fusion which gets rid of the immediate pain but the loading went on to my other toes which are similarly aff3cted now with no other options. There was talk by one surgeon of cutting the bones under my foot and dragging the joints…… that was ruled out. I also had the most incredible pain, in the top of my foot, it felt like a drop of molten metal on me, wouldn’t go away for years. One day I woke up and it’s never come back. The other foot? The story goes on. What I am trying to get across is that whatever is done is that you don’t always get what you wish for. You may sail through a procedure and probably will, just consider what you wish for.

    good luck.

    its a grin, honest!

  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 27,722
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    Hi there,

    My wrists fused themselves years ago, fortunately in a good position. It certainly stopped the pain but I think the idea of a fusion is to immobilise the joint(s). Mobility must be lost. Personally, I was happy with the equation of no mobility = no pain. Do ask your surgeon before having the other one done, though.

    If at first you don't succeed, then skydiving definitely isn't for you.
    Steven Wright
  • Andrew47nurdin
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    Thanks for the reply. The pain I had in my right wrist lasted for 2 year's. In that time I've had everything possible to make it better. But to no avail. So the eventually outcome was wrist fusion. When the pain started in my left wrist. I had a x-ray and the specialist basically said the wrist is going the same way as my right but because of the time frame involved I could have a partial wrist fusion. I've got to be honest I not looking forward but at least there will br no pain in both my wrists

  • Lilymary
    Lilymary Member Posts: 1,742
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    Sadly for some of us we have to make that decision - we give up some of what we expect our bodies to be able to do to get rid of the pain. It's a rotten compromise, and can take a while to come to terms with, but it's one we can't avoid eventually. The key is to manage expectations, adapt how we do things (and what we do) and ask for help when we need it. I hope your next surgery will leave you with a tolerable level of mobility, and most of all, no more pain.

  • remmingtonwildhunter
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    Good morning Andrew I had right wrist fused in 98 by an old school surgeon in plaster for 7 months And my left in 2005 by a super surgeon in plaster for 3 weeks not sure if they still take the top of your ilac crest (the hip) hurt ore than the opp...

    As a gardener it had its moments school gates were a challenge to unlock...

    I still do my sports mountain biking and I did got my 1st Dan in Aikido but you have to learn to adapt your every day life like being banished to the end of the table as my elbows stick up and I have heated gloves for the winter but I would say best thing I did...

  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 27,722
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    " banished to the end of the table as my elbows stick up"

    😮 Really? Mine don't. So far I've avoided table banishment😁

    If at first you don't succeed, then skydiving definitely isn't for you.
    Steven Wright
  • remmingtonwildhunter
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    Yes my son pushed my elbow down once and my chicken leg went flying..

    It will impact dailey life but you will adapt im glad I had it done although when I had my left one done I had just started a two year brick laying course at college which was hard jars lids are the worse as I have limited grip strength...

  • Andrew47nurdin
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    Thanks for the comments for me I find it hard to imagine that at 47 my wrists are done and dusted. Because of arthritis I still think though work as played a part in this .as from leaving school I've worked in a bakery for 31 years. I'm convinced that has something to do with it. Thanks again Andrew

  • Mcv
    Mcv Member Posts: 4
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    Hello, I was advised to have wrist fusion but after looking into it had my wrist joint replaced. Despite having limited mobility in my elbow, the wrist is now pain free, strong and flexible. I have to take care of the wrist and not overdo it but it’s changed my life hugely for the better. If you do explore this option, the expertise of the surgeon is crucial. Hope this helps Rosy

  • Andrew47nurdin
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    Was the operation on the nhs mcv the specialist never mentioned about my wrist joints replaced. Because of the pain in right wrist. Over a two years process it had to be fused. Now my left is going the same way .the specialist said I've got 2 opinions. Another wrist fused like my right or a partial fusion. Got to say I'm 47 and can't believe what arthritis can do to you

  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 27,722
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    If you were thinking of a wrist replacement you'd need to have a chat with your surgeon. They're not suitable for everyone. Here's what the Chesterfield NHS Trust says about their disadvantages

    Need to have a low-activity lifestyle  No Heavy lifting (manual work) is allowed  10 years survival 74-95% at 8-15 years(3)  Revision rate 20-50%(3)  Risk of surgical complications (14% to 25%)(1)

    And these are contra-indications

    Young / active lifestyle  Inability to comply with activity restriction / physical job  Inability to maintain active wrist extension (tendon/nerve dysfunction)  The use of a walking aid (e.g. walking stick/walker/frame)  Infection and/or poor bone stock

    https://www.chesterfieldroyal.nhs.uk/application/files/7916/3111/2381/Wrist_Joint_Fusion.pdf

    If at first you don't succeed, then skydiving definitely isn't for you.
    Steven Wright
  • Mcv
    Mcv Member Posts: 4
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    I have an Aptis Shecker wrist joint replacement. I have a pony that I ride most days and look after myself- mucking out, poo picking, filling haynets etc. I do have modifications to make it less demanding on my wrist but I had my 3 year check up last month and the surgeon says it’s looking great and rock solid. This type of implant is not suitable for everyone and not many surgeons are qualified to do this particular surgery but if you are a suitable candidate I would definitely recommend it. It’s changed my life

  • Andrew47nurdin
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    Thank you once again for the comments. Here's my problem I'm a Baker and confectioner I've worked since leaving school. 31 year's service to be precise. I know deep down when I have my left wrist operation it could be it for my career. But what I can't get my head around is how arthritis has done this to my wrists. I wonder that working in a bakery has contributed to it .thanks andrew

  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 27,722
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    Very little is known about the causes of OA, which can be many. Have a read here https://www.versusarthritis.org/about-arthritis/conditions/osteoarthritis/

    Personally, I don't think it helps to look back and wonder why. I think we have to look forward and think how. How can I do this? How must I adapt? We have to adapt constantly and, if we can do that, we can have a really good life albeit not the one we'd planned.

    I hope you'll be able to bake, if that's your thing. If not, have a good think about other things you've always wanted to do but maybe never had the time to pursue. That's how I've discovered so many pleasures.

    If at first you don't succeed, then skydiving definitely isn't for you.
    Steven Wright
  • Lilymary
    Lilymary Member Posts: 1,742
    edited 27. Sep 2022, 17:04
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    I agree with @stickywicket, don't look back, don't wonder why, it won't change anything, and is only useful if it can stop it happening again, which it probably won't. The real question is "ok, what next?"

    A friend's son was a chef in high end hotels. His sight started failing, which obviously impacted his work. (He's now registered blind.) They tried to make him redundant, he objected and under the DDA they had to accommodate his changed abilities. So they made him a dessert chef. Less heat and sharp knives involved. That worked for a while, but as a result of that change of direction he has now set up his own one-man company producing and selling absolutely delicious hand made chocolates. He started at the beginning of lock down, and made a go of it even in those economic conditions. His business is positively thriving now, including supplying those same high end hotels. It's funny how what seems like a door closing can in fact be sending you towards another that's opening. I hope this proves to be the case for you.

  • Andrew47nurdin
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    Well I had my pre operation on Monday 26th September my left wrist. The usual health questions plus swabs etc. Only to be told I'm back on the waiting list .which I kind of knew anyway. But today Thurs 29 they have rung to say on Monday 1st October I go in for my operation. To say I'm shocked is an understatement. I am know thinking have I got lucky or is my wrist that bad it needs doing ASAP. Any one else had a quick response in your operation. Thanks Andrew

  • noddingtonpete
    noddingtonpete Moderator Posts: 1,109
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    Hi @Andrew47nurdin it can happen if there are cancellations, so go for it and look forward to less pain when you come out the other side. Good luck

    Need more help? - call our Helpline on0800 5200 520Monday to Friday 9am to 6pm

  • FacilityGuy
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    Hi Andrew

    Did you have the operation and if so how is life now?

  • Ellen
    Ellen Moderator Posts: 1,668
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    Hi @FacilityGuy

    I am not sure whether @Andrew47nurdin has been online here recently, but @Charw has had both wrists fused and she still pops by:

    Best wishes

    Ellen.

  • IanS
    IanS Member Posts: 6
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    The NHS where I live (Aberdeen) are starting to offer the Motec wrist joint as an alternative to fusion. The joint has a successful track record in Scandinavia. Has anyone had any experience of it? https://swemac.com/orthopaedic-implants/motec-wrist-prosthesis-system/