hope I am not making myself a nuiance always posting

nickynysmon08
nickynysmon08 Bots Posts: 111
edited 5. Jan 2010, 11:44 in Living with Arthritis archive
just one small question maybe someone could give me a definitive answer to it. as i am still waiting to see a physio, I need to know what is the correct way to use a walking pole? suppose if I used the word walking stick the same would apply,
I have been told use the pole/stick on the opposite side to the one where there is most pain/ weakness etc. so, my right side being worse than my left, should I therefore use the pole in my left hand?
this is what I have been told, but some feedback from yourselves would be most appreciated,

best wishes,

Nick
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Comments

  • snoops
    snoops Member Posts: 29
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    just one small question maybe someone could give me a definitive answer to it. as i am still waiting to see a physio, I need to know what is the correct way to use a walking pole? suppose if I used the word walking stick the same would apply,
    I have been told use the pole/stick on the opposite side to the one where there is most pain/ weakness etc. so, my right side being worse than my left, should I therefore use the pole in my left hand?
    this is what I have been told, but some feedback from yourselves would be most appreciated,

    best wishes,

    Nick
    Hi Nick,
    Glad you asked that question because I have always wondered the right way to use one of those things. Too embarassed to ask before. I have one side worse than the other!!! :oops:
    Luv snoops
  • skezier
    skezier Member Posts: 11,333
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi Nick,

    With breaks you certainly use it on the opposite side to the injured leg/ foot etc. Same as good leg first going up and bad one first coming down. Take care, Cris
  • kathbee
    kathbee Member Posts: 934
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi Nick

    Hope this isnt a spanner in the works.

    I have RA and at my first physio session
    a few weeks ago I was told I wouldnt be
    given a crutch or stick nowadays for
    arthritis!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    and was asked 'who gave you the
    walking aids in the first place'

    My reply - physio :lol:

    My take on this being, well let the physio
    try walking around with the pain
    I have and without the help of a
    crutch or stick.
    But did I say it - no I didnt. :roll:

    Kath
  • bailey27
    bailey27 Member Posts: 689
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi
    I have been given crutches following the arthroscopy and the physio told me if I walk with just one then use it on the same side as the bad leg. To position the crutch first in front, follow with bad leg then good
  • vonski
    vonski Member Posts: 1,292
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi Nick

    You aren't a nuisance asking questions, how else would you find things out :) You should use the stick in the opposite hand to where you get most pain. That way if you have most pain at the left use right hand so that when you put the left foot down you get more support and hopefully a bit less pain. Try and get into a rythm so leg and stick move at the same time and you've cracked it :)

    Love
    Vonski x
  • nickynysmon08
    nickynysmon08 Bots Posts: 111
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    vonski wrote:
    Hi Nick

    You aren't a nuisance asking questions, how else would you find things out :) You should use the stick in the opposite hand to where you get most pain. That way if you have most pain at the left use right hand so that when you put the left foot down you get more support and hopefully a bit less pain. Try and get into a rythm so leg and stick move at the same time and you've cracked it :)

    Love
    Vonski x

    these are very helpful, but i would say a bit more though. i am starting my walking again, when I last went to snowdonia on Monday, I was told a few times by people to get a walking pole. many many walkers of all ages use them, I have always had inhibitions about using them, bit silly really, but now I have bought not one but three, call me daft, but they really do work.
    occasionally it is useful using two together on bad terrain. when using one, i am wondering if it should be used on the good side or bad side. their would seem to be conflicting answers to this, but Vonski (sorry what is your first name?) seems to have the answer. I tried using this way earlier today, yesterday, I used it on the bad side though.!!!!


    Nick
  • penfactor
    penfactor Member Posts: 366
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi there! I was told by the guy in the "stick shop!" to use on the opposite side to the pain so that you are "sharing the weight". Also the heathcare adviser in Boots said the same. I can't imagine I'd get far at all without my stick now so am also shocked by what the previous poster said.
    May I also enquire what a pole is & how does it differ to a stick? Is it better?
    Pennie X
  • nickynysmon08
    nickynysmon08 Bots Posts: 111
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    penfactor wrote:
    Hi there! I was told by the guy in the "stick shop!" to use on the opposite side to the pain so that you are "sharing the weight". Also the heathcare adviser in Boots said the same. I can't imagine I'd get far at all without my stick now so am also shocked by what the previous poster said.
    May I also enquire what a pole is & how does it differ to a stick? Is it better?
    Pennie X

    reply;

    this has proven a most interesting line of discussion. a pole is I believe either a German or Nordic idea. it is basically, an aluminium, or carbon fibre pole with extensions that allow its height to be adjusted, it has a point on the end, maybe with a slight spring, and a handle and strap for the hand. I suggest you follow the following link,

    it is widely used on the continent, and many more hikers are using them over here now. I do wish I had had more sense or wisdom to use one much earlier. and my knee supports. both have enabled me to get back into walking again, as good as all the tablets we are given put together, though i only have osteo in hips and knees,

    Nick

    http://www.millets.co.uk/category/walking/walking-poles.html

    also, do a google on it,
  • eckstardeluxe
    eckstardeluxe Member Posts: 1,192
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi, I can't answer as avoid my walking stick like the plague, but just wanted to say you are not being a nuisance. This is what we are here for, I'm just sorry I can't be of any help on this occasion, but if you post something i can help with I'll be glad to answer xx
  • frogmorton
    frogmorton Member Posts: 29,395
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi
    I wanted to say exactly the same as Ekcstar - the whole idea of this forum is to post queries!!!
    You just helped some of us too with info - it works both ways :wink:
    Toni x
  • mistywillow
    mistywillow Member Posts: 711
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    frogmorton wrote:
    Hi
    I wanted to say exactly the same as Ekcstar - the whole idea of this forum is to post queries!!!
    You just helped some of us too with info - it works both ways :wink:
    Toni x

    Hi Nick
    Post away, thats the whole purpose of this site and its terrific!
    I used to be a physio and generally the advice was to have your stick in the opposite side to your bad leg and move it forward together with your bad leg so that it takes some of the weight off your bad leg, and doesnt upset your posture and gait too much.
    With RA sometimes this can be difficult as often hands/elbows etc are also affected though.
    Chris also got it right when talking about stairs . I always told people to remember'good leg up to heaven, bad leg down to hell!)
    love Gillx
  • woodbon
    woodbon Member Posts: 4,969
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi Nick,

    I,ve always thought it was the good for the stick, to help the good leg out. However, my good side is my left and I'm very right handed. I've managed without a stick so far but I think I might be dangerous with my left hand using a stick.

    I do have 2 walking poles, bought in the lake district for uneven gound. I use them on walks in the country, although I don't walk very far or on very bad ground, they help. I don't feel I stand out in the lakes or somewhere like that as so many serious walkers use them. Love Sue
  • nickynysmon08
    nickynysmon08 Bots Posts: 111
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    woodbon wrote:
    Hi Nick,

    I,ve always thought it was the good for the stick, to help the good leg out. However, my good side is my left and I'm very right handed. I've managed without a stick so far but I think I might be dangerous with my left hand using a stick.

    I do have 2 walking poles, bought in the lake district for uneven gound. I use them on walks in the country, although I don't walk very far or on very bad ground, they help. I don't feel I stand out in the lakes or somewhere like that as so many serious walkers use them. Love Sue

    reply

    surely it is the bad leg we need to help out?

    anyhow, after all these thoughtful replies, I am using my pole on both sides as both my knees and hips are arthritic, but my right side is worse
    . I do try using the pole mainly, on the 'good' side though, which is my left, see how it goes


    next question may I ask, how can I lose a stone in weight?? next problem to be solved!!!!

    regards to all,

    Nick
  • frogmorton
    frogmorton Member Posts: 29,395
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Nick!!!
    Ha ha!!!
    If I knew the answer to that one I'd be a millionaire!! :wink:
    Nice one!
    Toni xx
  • penfactor
    penfactor Member Posts: 366
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Thank you posting the link on the poles - they look brilliant & so much cooler than my poor little stick!
    How to lose a stone? Oh when I was still fit that was so easy - I would be in the gym three times a week & doing brilliant aerobics classes with mates the other days. I could eat what I wanted, only cutting out crisps or chips when I'd gained a bit a losing weight just like that! Now I can only hobble around it does not use enough energy so I try not eating until the evening but still no loss & I'd like to lose two stone. Yet another problem Arthur bestows upon us, eh?!
    :x
    Pennie x
  • achealot
    achealot Member Posts: 22
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi Nick
    glad you asked cos I have a stick I bought a couple of years ago when I went up snowdon,the best thing I bought for years I couldn't have climbed the mountain without it, I now use it to walk the dog but I can only use it in my right hand no matter which hip or knee is hurting, just dont feel right in my left hand.
    But I do feel a bit paranoid using it I feel as if people are staring at me so I tend not to use it all the time.


    Brendan :)
  • nickynysmon08
    nickynysmon08 Bots Posts: 111
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    achealot wrote:
    Hi Nick
    glad you asked cos I have a stick I bought a couple of years ago when I went up snowdon,the best thing I bought for years I couldn't have climbed the mountain without it, I now use it to walk the dog but I can only use it in my right hand no matter which hip or knee is hurting, just dont feel right in my left hand.
    But I do feel a bit paranoid using it I feel as if people are staring at me so I tend not to use it all the time.


    Brendan :)

    reply

    this was one of my problems. the solution is as follows. every time I go out over the dingle at llangefni, I meet someone invariably using a stick. or even in an electric carriage. then when I go over the mountains so to speak, a third of the people I meet are using these sticks. often they are younger than I am.

    next I tell myself I fifty five in May,, so this gives me a degree of maturity?? shall we say. then I tell myself if i walked and had no knee supports and no stick I would soon end up in some degree of pain, and maybe be a lot of pain later on-- back to the tramadol!!!!

    . the big test is this. ask yourself why it is no one is taking any notice of the fact you are using a walking pole!! surely someone should take note of it. why is it it they are simply ignoring you? not even a bit of sympathy?? so, there is no reason to feel paranoid.

    hope these thoughts help,

    Nick[/i]
  • woodbon
    woodbon Member Posts: 4,969
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi I suppose it depends on what feels most helpful for the person using the stick. I know the physios round here tell us to use the stick on the good side, but that is my worst hand, both arther and it woudl mean using my left hand and i'm very right handed! :) We are individuals in the end and must be comfortable with walking aids as long as we're not a danger to ourselves. :shock: I've seen people I worked with doing potentially harmful things with walking frames!!! Love Sue
  • nickynysmon08
    nickynysmon08 Bots Posts: 111
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    woodbon wrote:
    Hi I suppose it depends on what feels most helpful for the person using the stick. I know the physios round here tell us to use the stick on the good side, but that is my worst hand, both arther and it woudl mean using my left hand and i'm very right handed! :) We are individuals in the end and must be comfortable with walking aids as long as we're not a danger to ourselves. :shock: I've seen people I worked with doing potentially harmful things with walking frames!!! Love Sue

    reply;
    I agree, Sue, it s up to the individual. there was no one more filled with inhibitions than I, and only after seeing what other people did, how many hikers, of all ages, use these poles, plus learning the precise reason. then I learned the value of them vis a vis, easing arthritic joints thus facilitating walking again. I had begun to suspect my walking days were gone forever, now, whilst I am waiting still, for the advice of a physio, in the meantime am taking a more measured approach to my joints. the alternative is pain and impairment.

    at the end of the day, one has to feel easy with sitting down, and doing things over a period of time. before a big walk, I will spend maybe two days almost resting, so the joints are recovered, then go for it.

    I am ever fearful of doing lasting damage and mindful I may have another thirty years inside this body, which is a very very sobering thought. there are specific guidelines we each can follow, but each of us must fulfill our own set of conditions.

    best wishes,

    Nick
  • hazelm
    hazelm Member Posts: 25
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi Nick,I'm glad you posted this, I've been in a bit of a pickle with this too. I 've been told to use a stick, but not how to use one, I tried with both hands,not at the same time, :lol: but can't use it because of the pain in my wrists, I have to swap hands every few minutes. Is there an alternative? xx :?
  • livinglegend
    livinglegend Member Posts: 1,425
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    When you walk with a stick it needs to help the injured/painful leg. Hence when you put your weight on the injured leg the stick should help support it.

    As we tend to swing our arm in the opposite direction to the movements of our leg on the same side to maintain balance, (ie. left leg and right arm forward), then it is natural, to retain a supportive, walking rhythm to hold the stick on the opposite side to the injured/painful leg.

    Joseph 8)
    Josephm0310.gif
  • sharmaine
    sharmaine Member Posts: 1,638
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi Nick
    I bought a walking stick about a month ago. I have OA in both knees but it's worse in the left knee so use it in my right hand. It didn't come with instructions and it took a bit of trial and error to get used to it. I find it a useful tool for getting in and out of the car; getting out of a sitting position and standing in queues (which I find particularly hard to do). The first time I used it I ached for a couple of days and then I realised I needed to relax with it whilst out walking and that has helped. It certainly makes walking easier and getting up easier.
    I had real trouble getting in and out of the car and the stick helps.
    I think medical professionals who do not have this condition have no idea how difficult it is to deal with simple everyday things. I now take my stick everywhere I go and use it both indoors and out. I bought another one which I keep upstairs as its useful tool if I need to get up in the middle of the night for the toilet and its handy for walking downstairs etc. It has been one of my best purchases.

    Sharmaine
    just one small question maybe someone could give me a definitive answer to it. as i am still waiting to see a physio, I need to know what is the correct way to use a walking pole? suppose if I used the word walking stick the same would apply,
    I have been told use the pole/stick on the opposite side to the one where there is most pain/ weakness etc. so, my right side being worse than my left, should I therefore use the pole in my left hand?
    this is what I have been told, but some feedback from yourselves would be most appreciated,

    best wishes,

    Nick
  • airwave
    airwave Member Posts: 579
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I have had numerous occasions to use a stick, always on the same side as the injured leg, up with the good and down with the bad, and yes it does b&*^%r up my shoulders/elbows/wrists/hands.

    Walking sticks and adjustable poles in Lidl's this week, cheap as chips!

    Lose a stone, easy, don't eat! :lol:

    8) Its a grin honest!
  • nickynysmon08
    nickynysmon08 Bots Posts: 111
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    hazelm wrote:
    Hi Nick,I'm glad you posted this, I've been in a bit of a pickle with this too. I 've been told to use a stick, but not how to use one, I tried with both hands,not at the same time, :lol: but can't use it because of the pain in my wrists, I have to swap hands every few minutes. Is there an alternative? xx :?

    reply

    when we go to the mountains I told we shou use two walking poles, especially if we are descending downhill. I will take two but only use one. I am still trying to decide which side to use them to help my right knee and hip, though may use them alternately as both sides are not very good.

    one thing about these poles, and I have bought Leki , though you can find them cheaper, one thing, they all have straps for the hands. you place the hand in the strap then tighten it to suit. then you have total grip. I find a simple wrist action helps, in thrusting the pole forward. the respondent who said to be relaxed in using them is quite right. I still have to learn relaxation or else my shoulders ache.
    again by using knee supports and a pole, much of the ache has been taken out of walking for me. I ache now when I do too little exercise. getting it right is not easy,

    best wishes,
    Nick
  • woodbon
    woodbon Member Posts: 4,969
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I think the thinking is, that if one leg is bad you put your weight on the good side, which means that is taking too much strain, so the stick helps that side! But, hey as long as it feels the right side for you does it matter? Rules are made to be broken!!! :D Love Sue