Prolotherapy

TraceyS
TraceyS Member Posts: 9
edited 24. Apr 2021, 11:28 in Living with arthritis

Has anyone tried prolotherapy injections? Do they work? A quick Google search brought up lots of promising studies on prolotherapy effectiveness for treating osteoarthritis pain - better efficacy than both exercise and cortisone injections.

Comments

  • Mike1
    Mike1 Member Posts: 1,992

    Prolotherapy is not widely available on the NHS so there may be a significant cost implication (£500+) to trying this treatment. It is usually seen as an option to try when other options have failed to maintain an improvement.

  • sunnyside2
    sunnyside2 Member Posts: 131

    Glad you answered as I too have been looking at that. I think will be out of my price bracket - for that price I would be wanting money back if doesn't work lol

  • TraceyS
    TraceyS Member Posts: 9

    Thank you for reply. Yeah I guessed it wouldn't be available on the NHS and that it would be pricey. I'm at the point where options are running out. Steroid injection last year helped but only lasted six months. I'm a big advocate of exercise but as OA progresses I'm finding I'm not able to lift so much weight to maintain muscle strength, plus muscles and connective tissue are becoming increasingly tight, though my flexibility remains good. Fingers crossed for some miracle breakthrough in non surgical treatment lol!

  • Thackers
    Thackers Member Posts: 6

    A local sports doctor near me does Prolotherapy injections and last week mentioned there is a lot of good recent eveidence supporting this procedure.

    I was just hoping some member(s) may have tried it as it says it can regenerate cartlidge regardless of age.


    I might have to try

  • jonr
    jonr Member Posts: 380

    Thackers: "I was just hoping some member(s) may have tried it as it says it can regenerate cartlidge regardless of age."

    I did a bit of Googling on this and there's a decent amount of info on Wikipedia:

    Based on the info there, trials have been somewhat mixed but in any event, it doesn't look like a treatment for regeneration, more as an anaesthetic.

    I believe Glucosomine is more widely taken to slow down the deterioration of bone and tissue, so if you've not looked at that then maybe investigate a little more:

    Type 2 Collagen (not "Marine or Type 1) is also taken by some Arthritis sufferers as well:

    In the case of both Glucosamine and Collagen I found taking these supplements made my symptoms worse - I have OA in both knees and a few days after adding these to my daily intake of pills and potions my legs were hot and very achy, I was also experiencing more tendon "pings". I think with a lot of these things it's a bit hit and miss but you might gain some benefit.

    Best,

    jon

  • jonr
    jonr Member Posts: 380

    TraceyS: "I'm a big advocate of exercise but as OA progresses I'm finding I'm not able to lift so much weight to maintain muscle strength, plus muscles and connective tissue are becoming increasingly tight, though my flexibility remains good"

    I don't wieght-lift but I am a keen walker, cyclist and gym-goer and like you I began to experience issues with connecting tissues and tendons which were having to over-compensate for the lack of strength in my knees.

    I don't know what you're using to manage your muscle and tendon stiffness but I've found a deep tissue massaging gun to be particularly effective at relieving knots , smoothing out tendons and maintaining suppleness.There's a good choice on Amazon to suit most budgets.

    Good luck!

    jon

  • Thackers
    Thackers Member Posts: 6

    Thanks both.

    im a little confused on what I should and shouldn’t do at the gym anymore.

    I find after doing too much, I now have some instability when fast walking which worries me.

    I think I need to try the bike again .

    I take high strength tumeric and glucosamine from Natures best but because of all the physio, acupuncture I’m unsure what helps and what doesn’t to be honest